News & Discussion: Education

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shuza
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News & Discussion: Education

#1 Post by shuza » Wed May 02, 2007 4:25 pm

New trade schools plan unveiled
NICK HENDERSON, POLITICAL REPORTER
May 02, 2007 10:30am
PLANS for 10 new trade schools in South Australia were outlined by Premier Mike Rann today.

He said each school would be linked to the community in which it is operating and the schools would focus on defence, mining and electronics.
Mr Rann said the first trade schools would be built in Parafield Gardens, the western suburbs, and Whyalla and Peterborough.

The first schools will open before the end of the year.

"This is a revolution in basically changing the way we do schooling," he said.

"I think it will be terrific because what we are offering young people is greater flexibility.'

Mr Rann said a Bill would be introduce to Parliament next month to raise the school leaving age from 16 to 17.

"We want every young South Australian to be in school, training or meaningful work, not sitting at home on the couch, causing mischief or drifting without any real goals," he said.

Mr Rann first announced the school leaving age would be raised to 17 last year.

(c) AdelaideNow
I think this is a good focus for education, making the move towards more skill-based learning facilities. With the onset of the mining boom and defence industries, these positions are sure to fill fast.

However, as a student I am against the proposed bill changes of school leaving age to 17. All students should at least complete Year 10 of education (first year of senior school) and then decide on whether to leave or not. It is not for the government to intervene on the decisions of a 15/16 year old who is maturely capable of making their own life choices at that time.

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Re: Trade Schools for state

#2 Post by Will » Thu May 03, 2007 11:02 pm

shuza wrote:
New trade schools plan unveiled
NICK HENDERSON, POLITICAL REPORTER
May 02, 2007 10:30am
PLANS for 10 new trade schools in South Australia were outlined by Premier Mike Rann today.

He said each school would be linked to the community in which it is operating and the schools would focus on defence, mining and electronics.
Mr Rann said the first trade schools would be built in Parafield Gardens, the western suburbs, and Whyalla and Peterborough.

The first schools will open before the end of the year.

"This is a revolution in basically changing the way we do schooling," he said.

"I think it will be terrific because what we are offering young people is greater flexibility.'

Mr Rann said a Bill would be introduce to Parliament next month to raise the school leaving age from 16 to 17.

"We want every young South Australian to be in school, training or meaningful work, not sitting at home on the couch, causing mischief or drifting without any real goals," he said.

Mr Rann first announced the school leaving age would be raised to 17 last year.

(c) AdelaideNow
I think this is a good focus for education, making the move towards more skill-based learning facilities. With the onset of the mining boom and defence industries, these positions are sure to fill fast.

However, as a student I am against the proposed bill changes of school leaving age to 17. All students should at least complete Year 10 of education (first year of senior school) and then decide on whether to leave or not. It is not for the government to intervene on the decisions of a 15/16 year old who is maturely capable of making their own life choices at that time.
You are not serious are you?

A 15/16 year old is not capable of making life choices for themselves. They lack the maturity or experience to make such significant decisions.

It is better to keep teenagers in schooling or similar, in order to give them the best opportunities available in life. If you leave school in year 10, you are very limited to the jobs you can get.

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Re: Trade Schools for state

#3 Post by AG » Fri May 04, 2007 12:47 pm

Will wrote:If you leave school in year 10, you are very limited to the jobs you can get.
Complete nonsense. This is one of those mentalities that really annoys me, that you must last through school and university in order to get an opportunity of getting a good job and earning a good standard of living. The opportunities out there are endless, it depends on what one is passionate for and what they can do, not get the best academic scores and get a government job or in the baking sector, etc. I knew of a couple of guys older than myself who dropped out of school after year 10. They are now multi-millionaires working in the asbestos-removal industry. Take a look at Bill Gates, the world's wealthiest person, he dropped out of school as well and look where he is.

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Re: Trade Schools for state

#4 Post by Will » Fri May 04, 2007 3:33 pm

AG wrote:
Will wrote:If you leave school in year 10, you are very limited to the jobs you can get.
Complete nonsense. This is one of those mentalities that really annoys me, that you must last through school and university in order to get an opportunity of getting a good job and earning a good standard of living. The opportunities out there are endless, it depends on what one is passionate for and what they can do, not get the best academic scores and get a government job or in the baking sector, etc. I knew of a couple of guys older than myself who dropped out of school after year 10. They are now multi-millionaires working in the asbestos-removal industry. Take a look at Bill Gates, the world's wealthiest person, he dropped out of school as well and look where he is.
Sure AG, there are always exceptions, but really what is the percentage of people who drop out of school that become millionaires, let alone well-off? The fundamental reality is that education gives you greater opportunities in life. The relative poverty of areas like Elizabeth is inextricably linked to the low school retention rates of the area, which translates in lower education levels and hence lower opportunities.

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Re: Trade Schools for state

#5 Post by AG » Fri May 04, 2007 3:55 pm

Will wrote:Sure AG, there are always exceptions, but really what is the percentage of people who drop out of school that become millionaires, let alone well-off? The fundamental reality is that education gives you greater opportunities in life. The relative poverty of areas like Elizabeth is inextricably linked to the low school retention rates of the area, which translates in lower education levels and hence lower opportunities.
What you've mentioned here is true, but the sort of people you seem to be discussing are teenagers who drop out because they have little to no motivation to succeed in life. Yes, this is probably the case for a lot of students who drop out of school after year 10, but there are some who drop out to go on to work in areas that don't require university degrees or in developing new technologies or providing new goods and services that previously didn't exist to the community, and they are very successful in what they do.

Basically what I'm getting at here is that you do not need high education and university degrees necessarily to be successful, although education is still vital to at least some degree. Having said that, I am enjoying what I do at uni because I do have a passion for it.

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#6 Post by Will » Fri May 04, 2007 4:38 pm

I agree with you that to be succesful you do not need a high TER or a university degree. What I am saying is that leaving school at 15 or 16 is detrimental to a person's future opportunities. By education I was referring to trade schools or similar, if a person is not academically gifted.

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#7 Post by Pistol » Fri May 04, 2007 5:19 pm

Learn more to earn more... Simple!

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#8 Post by Cruise » Fri May 04, 2007 6:19 pm

I can say i left school early and i now own my own house (with more to come hopefully)
Also im 19 (20 in 17 days)

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#9 Post by crawf » Sat May 05, 2007 9:16 pm

I think the plan to raise the school leaving age to 17 is a great idea, just hope the plan doesn't backfire.

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#10 Post by jimmy_2486 » Sun May 06, 2007 1:29 pm

I think one should at least try his/her best to get good marks in school and go as far as you can, as it does show to your employer that you are discipline and not a quitter.

It is a competitive world out there and getting a degree or certificate probably doesn't just cut it anymore. For example why should one get hired cos they have the certificate/degree when everyone who applied for the position has the same certificate/degree etc.

I was once 15 years old too some 6 years ago and I thought I knew exactly what to do as well....how very wrong I was!!

Thank god I had strict parents...hahaha.

I think the problem is that a lot of teenagers want to experience making money because they see their friends with a car and bragging how they make 500-700 a week and they want some of the action too. Which leads to a lot of teenagers dropping out and getting a job cos they think they will like it (and every job is exciting in the beginning). Then they hate their job down the track and regret their decision.

What teenagers should be doing is pursuing a hobby and trying to set themselves up to make a career out of it and not think about work as making money but as doing something you love. Also schools should cater to this by having a wider range of subjects.

And to the talk about drop-outs becoming millionaires, its not an overnight success story. All these people know how to run a business and I doubt a 15 year old would know how to do this unless they had strong business and marketing knowledge which usually comes from getting a degree or diploma or at least finishing school.

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#11 Post by shuza » Sun May 06, 2007 1:35 pm

Considering the input from school-aged forumers here, I'm surprised about the feedback that has been given over the legal school leaving age. Whilst it does vary dependant on the person's maturity levels and authority to control their lives, there should at least be a standarisation to appease those who ARE mature and focused on acheiving some success post-school era, hence 16 years of age.

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#12 Post by crawf » Thu May 10, 2007 9:16 pm

After seeing so many people drop out of Year 10 and 11, now wishing they stayed at school or some even going back there. The school leaving age needs to be raised, to keep SA and Australia on track.

While I think Year 12 is BS, most businesses and courses/degrees require you have it. So majority of people have no choice, thats if they don't want to end on the dole queue or in the parklands.

Though there is exemptions.

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#13 Post by AtD » Thu May 10, 2007 10:02 pm

Rather than leaving the school leaving age, perhaps raise the education leaving age, so you could leave school at 15 for Tafe or an Apprenticeship, but not drop out.

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#14 Post by rev » Thu May 10, 2007 10:12 pm

Those who drop out of school and go on to tafe, are doing what they want to do with their lives.

Iv yet to meet any tradey who regrets it or is struggling to make ends meet. On the contrary.

[quote=crawf]
So majority of people have no choice, thats if they don't want to end on the dole queue or in the parklands.
[/quote]

What a load of rubbish.
My godfather dropped out of school when he was 15, and he makes more money per year then you will in ten.
Far from being on a dole queue or being in the parkland's wouldn't you say?


What is needed is more options in school that lead onto tafe/trade schools.
Up until recently most schools only offered subjects, with a mindset of going on to university.
Those who didn't want to go to university had to drop out at 15, 16 and go to tafe on their own.
The focus shouldn't be on university study solely. Its not suited for everyone, nor is the study that leads up to it.
Students need to be prepared for and given a variety of options.
And importantly, they also need to be supported not looked down upon or given lectures about how the only hope they have in life is going to university.

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#15 Post by crawf » Thu May 10, 2007 11:12 pm

rev wrote:What a load of rubbish.
My godfather dropped out of school when he was 15, and he makes more money per year then you will in ten.
Far from being on a dole queue or being in the parkland's wouldn't you say?
I could name heaps of people who have succeed in life without Year 11 or 12 in the 1950s-80s. Back in those days Year 11 and 12 wasn't as compulsory as it is now. so thats a poor example.

And I said there was exemptions. Though it depends on what career you want to get into; though all the courses I'm interested in, most of them ask for at least Year 12.

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