Fringe Festival

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Fringe Festival

#1 Post by Wayno » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:13 am

i like the free transport & guides to get people moving around the city. The use of animals as transport is an interesting idea - kangaroos perhaps ;-)

From AdelaideNow
THE Adelaide Fringe parade will move to King William St next year and its opening party will be replaced.

Fringe tickets will also go on sale online a month earlier than usual, on December 10, before the official program release in January.

Free buses will provide transport between different parts of the city during the Fringe, with onboard tour guides and signs at stops to point out various venues.

"We want to highlight and promote all of the venues even further," Fringe director Greg Clarke said yesterday. The new parade route will run from Victoria Square, along King William St to North Tce, on February 24 at 8pm.

It will also feature different forms of transportation, ranging from buses and cars to animals, as well as performers on foot.

"On board will be all the artists, and venues will hopefully have their own floats as well," Mr Clarke said. Premier-in-waiting Jay Weatherill, standing in for Minister Assisting the Premier in the Arts John Hill, said this year's Fringe attracted 1.45 million attendances at more than 750 events.

It also drew 15,000 visitors from interstate and overseas, pumping $40 million into the state's economy.

"It is truly the most accessible and popular festival of its type in this state, and across the nation," Mr Weatherill said. Fringe chair Judy Potter said the event continued to expand.

"Since 2005 it has totally doubled in events, in venue registrations, in audience numbers, and our belief is it will keep growing," Ms Potter said.

The Fringe has partnered with Transfield Services and the Department of Transport to provide free buses which will run between seven stops through the city.

"The whole thing really is about getting people at night time moving around the city," Mr Clarke said.

Mr Clarke said the free buses fit with next year's Fringe theme, The Tour of the Unexpected. The decision to do away with an opening night party was to put the emphasis back on individual venues.

"In the past, we have very much centred the celebrations in one spot, but we actually want the whole city to be a party that night," Mr Clarke said.

Artist registrations for next year's Fringe close on Wednesday and gift vouchers will go on sale from its website next week.
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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#2 Post by [Shuz] » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:42 am

Cue the return of the horse & cart and desert camels... :P
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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#3 Post by metro » Wed Oct 12, 2011 10:28 pm

will we ever get that huge ferris wheel that was supposed to be put up for the 2009 Fringe? :?

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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#4 Post by monotonehell » Wed Dec 21, 2011 8:28 am

Looks like Tuxedo Cat is opening in the old jazz club at 199 North Tce for this summer.
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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#5 Post by Ben » Tue Jan 03, 2012 9:51 am

From The Adelaide Review:
What’s new Tuxedo Cat?
January, 2012

Adelaide’s “cultural boulevard”, North Terrace is home to heritage institutions the State Library of South Australia, the South Australian Museum and the Art Gallery of South Australia but as Jane Howard discovers, the 2012 Fringe will add pop up venues to North Terrace’s list of must see destinations.


This festival season a new cultural venue will open on the southern side of North Terrace, the latest incarnation of the Tuxedo Cat. Since 2008, the Tuxedo Cat has established a reputation as one of the most loved Fringe hubs for independent performing
arts work.

Established and run by Bryan Lynagh and Cassandra Tombs, the Cat, as they affectionately call it, started as a rooftop venue in Synagogue Place off Rundle Street, running for three Fringes before the building underwent development. For the 2011 Fringe they opened in Electra House opposite Town Hall, also sitting empty in preparation of development. In 2012, they will be operating in Club 199 and the iconic 200 North Terrace.

“We feel like it’s our best address yet,” says Lynagh over a drink. “I think it’s a good mix having the Art Gallery and Library and Museum just across the road from a grassroots arts venue.”

Working with Renew Adelaide, the Cat’s access to the buildings is supported by Le Cordon Bleu, Maras Group, and Commercial and General. Renew Adelaide’s CEO Ianto Ware estimates this support could amount to in excess of $100,000 for nothing more than the recognition of the contribution of these organisations to Adelaide’s cultural revival.

At the time of the interview, Tombs and Lynagh have only had access to the space for a few weeks, and Lynagh has been “inhaling concrete dust all day” while working on the venue. While this is their fifth Fringe under the Tuxedo Cat banner, the pair still struggle with red tape.

“In some ways it feels like year one,” says Lynagh.

“Everyone talks about ‘activating spaces’ and governments wanting to help,” says Tombs, “but this is a pretty mega project. It’s two buildings side-by-side; we’re going to be out the front and in an alley way with five theatres. There are no clear steps, as yet, to start this project.

“We do like using disused spaces, or unusual spaces, non-traditional spaces. Having said that, though, they always come with a handful of problems: building code compliancy; acoustic problems; traffic management regarding human movement and security. I actually quite like the puzzle of trying to sort that all out.

“It’s not the easiest way to run a business,” she concedes.

This new, large-scale venue echoes similar reclaimed spaces for artists established interstate. Melbourne’s River Street Studios, and Sydney’s Queen Street Studios and Firstdraft Depot have been established through ties between artists, arts workers, developers, city councils and arts funding organisations. These spaces are not-for-profit ventures where experimentation, work in development, and low-scale production is encouraged and supported by low rent or venue hire fees.

Lynagh and Tombs also run a second Cat in Melbourne, borne out of frustrations with the Adelaide City Council and Liquor Licensing. After the second year in Synagogue Place, Tombs didn’t believe Adelaide would be ongoing.

“I thought, we’re not going to be able to do this here, we need to change this right up, so we just did Melbourne. A year later, we just kept pushing and pushing and pushing in Adelaide and made some headway, so now we’re doing both.”

Word of these venues has travelled far. Next year, the pair will be opening a venue at the Cairns Festival at the invitation of the local council: “Tuxedo Cat goes troppo,” laughs Tombs.

In Adelaide, for Club 199 at least, Lynagh and Tombs will be leasing the building on six-month guarantee. The pair is excited about this space continuing beyond the Fringe in an ongoing contribution to Adelaide’s art scene. “People ask during Fringe, ‘Are you going to be here afterwards?’ and now we can say, ‘Yes’,” Lynagh explains excitedly.

At the heart of the Cat is the community of artists and audiences it engages. “The Tuxedo Cat community is great,” says Lynagh. “There is a lot of love for the Cat. People just want to be involved.”

While the community support is fantastic, creating these spaces comes with a financial burden. “It’s all on a shoestring budget; well, it’s all on our credit card,” he remarks. “This is what council and government talk about all the time, and we’re actually going to do it.”

Despite this, the pair holds a strong commitment to placing the needs of the artists at the centre of the venue.

“When you’re a creative person, you’ve got an idea for a show and you’re going to put a show on, you need to do a show in front of an audience,” says Tombs. “You need feedback from an audience, to see if it’s funny, see if it all works, see if it ties together. Is it even a show?

“But what was starting to happen was unless you were prepared to sell your car or go into debt, you weren’t getting a chance to get those ideas out into the public domain. So we tried to keep our venue hire as low as functionally possible, and it includes your tech and your lighting. It’s really basic stuff. We are catering for artists that are trying out new ideas.”

During the 2012 Fringe, the venue will house more than 40 artists completing 450 performances. “We’re positive, we have a purpose, we work our guts out,” says Lynagh. “I’ll tell you what, if I wasn’t running Tuxedo Cat I would be going there all the time and drinking and checking out shows, definitely.”

Laughing, he shakes his head, “It’s such a shame.”

Other Fringe and Festival season pop-up venues

Arcade Lane
For the third year running, Ross Stanley will be running his pop-up venue Arcade Lane off Grenfell Street. Adjacent to the former Regent Cinema, Stanley uses the abandoned cinema spaces to create two indoor theatres off a laneway filled with bands, DJs and roving performances.

Over the years, Stanley has observed a broad group of Fringe goers discovering the lane. “You’ve got 20-year-olds rubbing shoulders with advertising executives rubbing shoulders with 60-year-old theatre-goers,” he says. “Generally speaking, everyone’s a little bit creative or a little bit on the arty tip, and they’re looking for that alternative experience.”

Barrio
In 2012, the Adelaide Festival’s night hub is moving off the riverbank and onto the plaza behind Parliament House. Festival designer Geoff Cobham describes the new space as a “scaffolding shantytown”, a maze incorporating music performances and eight themed bars.

While Barrio will begin construction on the plaza less than two weeks before the opening on March 2, Cobham says the trick to the venue is, “trying to keep it looking like it’s something that’s just grown organically, rather than something we’ve constructed. It should look like something that’s been there for years, and it’s slowly been built over the years by the people who live there”.

The Queen’s Theatre
The Queen’s Theatre was a theatre in its short life from inception in 1840, to closure in 1842. It has since been used for everything from law courts to horse yards, with the now gutted frame often a performance warehouse space during festivals.

For the 2012 Fringe it has come under the management of local company No Strings Attached Theatre of Disability, who are transforming the space into a three-theatre, two-bar performance hub.

Venue manager Kathryn Sproul is excited by “the charm, the challenge, and its unexpectedness. How we set up will be unique to this experience, and it won’t be how anyone else has set it up before”.

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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#6 Post by Wayno » Tue Jan 03, 2012 11:53 am

The Fringe will incorporate these venues in 2012: http://www.thebigslapple.com.au/. Click on the links inside the apple.
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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#7 Post by metro » Mon Feb 27, 2012 10:07 pm

the fringe opening was pretty good this year, there were so many people in the city. With so many people around it felt as busy as Sydney, and then at the end of the night I get on a train which only had 2 carriages and was fully loaded with people, and this was at 10pm. :roll:

Something interesting I learned from some German girls near where we were, they were talking about 'Carnival' and how Adelaide's Fringe was similar, only at their Carnival they have a parade and everyone is dressed up in silly costumes and drunk. :lol:

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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#8 Post by crawf » Tue Feb 28, 2012 12:40 am

The Fringe Parade needs some serious work. It dragged on far too long, disaorganised and the DJ played some very random music. Pretty sure I heard the F word :P

However the illuminated buildings along KWS looked truly AMAZING!

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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#9 Post by Ben » Tue Feb 28, 2012 8:44 am

There also needs to be a much larger police presence. I could of swore every single teenager in Adelaide was in the city, was drunk and was making the CBD rather intimidating. It was not a good vibe after the parade at all, rather scary actually.

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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#10 Post by Wayno » Tue Feb 28, 2012 8:55 am

anyone have any pikkies from the opening night? i could not make it along :-(
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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#11 Post by [Shuz] » Tue Feb 28, 2012 9:29 am

I went to go along, but I couldn't watch the Parade because it was standing room only and up to 10 people deep in places. I couldn't see a thing. I had expected that they would install temporary grandstand seating, like they do with the TDU and Pageant and be able to sit down in a civil and orderly manner. Instead, I had to get my hands and feet dirty by climbing up the pole of a bus sign just to get a view.

The lighting and pyrotechnics display were pretty awesome, but I felt that the backdrop of the buildings on King William Street weren't suitable for such a display.

But then again, let's give credit where credit is due. It was the first time they have hosted the Parade on King William Street and I am sure that they will learn from the lessons of the event, such as - having temporary seating installed! And maybe not having it on King William Street either. Having to close the tramline at a time when some 50,000+ people are in the City is not such a good idea!

They'd be better off doing the Parade down the northern end of King William Street and down North Terrace to either Pulteney or Frome Streets, from St. Peter's Cathedral and turning left through the slip lane onto North Terrace. That way they could keep the tramline open, make use of the wider road and open space along the route and capitalise on the use of our cultural boulevard by doing the lighting and pyrotechnics display along the North Terrace buildings - which looked great during the Northern Lights event a few years back.

:2cents:
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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#12 Post by Wayno » Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:45 am

[Shuz] wrote:I went to go along, but I couldn't watch the Parade because it was standing room only and up to 10 people deep in places
well that's certainly a nice problem to own :-)
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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#13 Post by crawf » Tue Feb 28, 2012 2:53 pm

The trams were still running, just not between Victoria Square and the Railway Station. I had no dramas getting home Friday night on the Ent Centre tram.

The King William Street location was perfect, though next year they should open both sides of the street for spectators.
Ben wrote:There also needs to be a much larger police presence. I could of swore every single teenager in Adelaide was in the city, was drunk and was making the CBD rather intimidating. It was not a good vibe after the parade at all, rather scary actually.
Yeah I noticed next to zero police presence which was odd considering there is always police officers in the city day or not. The preachers were also in the mall, though this time without any microphones or war-like scenes.

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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#14 Post by Wayno » Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:53 am

Symphony in Elder Park this Friday night, including 'spaghetti western music'. Should be excellento!
THE mere mention of spaghetti westerns is enough to make Italian film music composer Ennio Morricone, 83, reach for his six-shooter.

Morricone, the world's most famous living film composer exclaims "They are not spaghetti westerns! You don't eat them! They are Sergio Leone westerns."

This was a reference to the producer and director of the most famous films in the genre.

Morricone, the man behind the music for The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, was in Adelaide yesterday rehearsing the 200 musicians and singers appearing in this Friday night's concert in Elder Park.

"I am sorry that sometimes I am only known for them (westerns), because they're only five of the films among the 400 I have composed for some really famous directors," he said.

Speaking through a translator, he said that on Friday night, only 15 minutes of the two-hour program would feature that music.

The Adelaide Symphony Orchestra and some of Morricone's own musicians will take to the stage at Elder Park on Friday with a chorus of 100 singers.

Morricone has brought some of his own musicians, soprano, keyboards and synthesiser, drummer and electric guitar and bass players, schooled in the musical expressions and starbursts that characterise his output.

At 83, Morricone is the world's most famous living film composer.

Adelaide Festival director Paul Grabowsky said yesterday he had been able to entice Morricone and his wife, Maria Travia, on their first visit to Australia after realising the maestro had been devoting more of his time to conducting and the performance of his music in recent years.

Morricone said he was still composing films, and is working on Italian film director Giuseppe Tornatore's next film. He said he continued to develop with experience, and his favourite film was always his latest film.

"It's really important to be personally satisfied with the music one writes, and with the result in the film," he said.

Yesterday there were still a few premium tickets available for Friday night's Elder Park concert.

Saturday's sold-out talk with film critic David Stratton has been moved from its 6.30pm timeslot to 11am to fit the maestro's schedule.
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Re: 2012 Fringe Festival

#15 Post by victorious80 » Fri Mar 09, 2012 7:39 am

Was at the Fringe area in Light Square last night. Really good atmosphere. We saw a play at Higher Ground, then hung around in the square for a few drinks. They have a few bars, a projector showing images on one of the buldings, and some bands playing too. The actors from the play even came out after the show for a chat and a drink.

The square looked great, it was very well attended and a great alternative to the east end Fringe setup.

Will definitely be returning there!

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