Official Food Thread

Anything goes here.. :) Now with Beer Garden for our smoking patrons.
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Wayno
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Re: Food Thread

#61 Post by Wayno » Tue May 05, 2009 4:40 pm

Jam the Bistro

http://www.adelaidereview.com.au/food_a ... =&ucat=17&
This restaurant sounds interesting, and i agree that the Gouger St Food Hub is slowly expanding into nearby streets...
Gouger Street is growing. It is over-flowing towards the North, over the Grote Street boundary, led by restaurants like British India In Morphett Street and places near the newly optimistic Metropolitan Hotel.

To the South on Morphett Street, Ming’s Steamboat Restaurant has made it respectable to walk on that side of the street.

Now, further down Morphett Street, on the corner of Wright and Whitmore Square, BT’z Hotel, is no more. I wouldn’t be surprised if BT’z stood for Bums and Tits, but I never got around to asking. In its place is the Whitmore Hotel. It is still in the process of being renovated but it is open for business. Not funny business. Don’t make any lap-dance jokes. I imagine the new proprietors have heard the lot by now.

Going East towards the Courts you may have noticed a sign saying “Aramis” on the ground floor of the new building destined to be filled with hundreds of lawyers. This is to be the site of a food and wine adventure of a kind that Adelaide has not seen before. I know more than I am saying, but I must leave some anticipation and excitement in your life. The consummate entrepreneur and host, David Bui, is back from Queensland. David was the driving force behind a number of restaurants here some years ago. He has been spotted (by me) waving plans around on Gouger Street. So probably at least a couple of restaurants will appear soon. He tends not to do restaurants one at a time. The most surprising extension off the Gouger strip is The Jam, or, to use its proper name: Jam the Bistro.

Walk into Field Street off Gouger Street on Gaucho’s corner, continue past Angelakis wholesale HQ and stop at Wright Street. You may remember a rabbit shop on the corner? You have found Jam. Incredible. A restaurant in Wright Street? There’s only the odd warehouse and lawyers, lawyers and lawyers. Plump, recession-proof lawyers. Plus half a chance of getting a park. Plus fresh fish 20 steps away and a place that shucks oysters to order next door.

Inside is boldly decorated, white with red trimmings, with a silver coffee machine that looks large enough to drive home and no doubt cost more than my car. Eat outside under umbrellas on fine days, perch on a stool and contemplate the world for a quick meal, slump around a table for a long meal. Or the other way around. I have had breakfast here many times and the waiting staff and the chefs don’t mind which way you go around with the menu either. If you must have maple syrup on the confit of tomatoes and pancetta and with a side of spinach and strawberries no-one will arrange for an humane end to your life at the hands of a competent vet, as I would. All you will get at Jam is a sweet smile and exactly what you want.

Service at Jam is excellent. Staff have remembered the strange coffee variations of my friends and me. Triple filtered un-homogenised goat’s milk fair trade latte coffee with a froth of coeliac. If you are hungry, eat the Jam breakfast - Barossa chipolatas, smoked bacon, Roma tomatoes with scrambled eggs on sour dough bread. Or possibly the Blue Swimmer crab omelette with dill, shallots, fennel seeds and rocket. Both cost $13.90 each.
The “Traditional Breakfast” toasted ciabatta, eggs as you like with bacon and tomato is $9.90. Yes, there are cheaper breakfasts around the Central Market, I’ve had them and they are rubbish. Proper ingredients cooked well are essential. Particularly in the morning when you may be at your most fragile. You can’t go to court on an empty stomach, Sunshine.

At lunch, we shared an entree of saganaki, with rocket, tomato, white anchovies and preserved lemon on toast.

The experienced Owner/Chef John Pana has a Greek heritage and probably about six more syllables in his original family name. (If people can’t pronounce the simple, Irish “McGrath” imagine what happens to the Greeks?) So saganaki sounded a safe choice and it was much more than that. Melted on the inside, evenly crisp on the outside. A $12.90 entrée was enough for two. What did we do before white anchovies? We made do with the nasty, brown, over-salted models equipped with needle-sharp bones that punctured gums. I am doomed to eat at restaurants on the cusp of a menu change. Not that it matters much at market-close Jam. Snapper was on the menu but blue eye trevalla was on special, served with the same accompaniments as the snapper - large pan seared local prawns, lemon and szuchuan peppers. Blue eye is more often seen in East coast restaurants. Its strong flavour was well balanced by the szuchuan pepper, a gutsy ingredient to risk with fish ($28.00).

My friend had made his main course decision when he walked in the door and spied a patron tucking into tagliatelle puttanesca made with veal meatballs, veal, caper-berries, olives, white anchovies and fresh tomatoes with Parmigiano Regiano. ($22.00) A beautiful dish. Meatballs can be hard and horrible. These weren’t.
We were responsible and only had a glass of wine each, a Will Taylor Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon and a Chalmers Aglianico from NSW. The wine list too, is changing.

Next time you are down Gouger Street way, remember that the best choices aren’t always Asiatic.

JAM THE BISTRO
112-114 Wright Street Adelaide
Phone: 8231 7411
Monday – Friday: 7am -11am
Saturday: 7am - 2pm
Lunch Monday - Friday
DinnerThursday - Saturday
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

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Re: Food Thread

#62 Post by Will » Wed May 06, 2009 3:22 pm

Thanks for posting that Wayno.

In the last few years there has been a renaissance in the food scene in Adelaide. You just have to look at the number of new and stylsih eateries that have opened up to see how true this is.


If I had to choose, the thing that i love most about Adelaide is how the city is such a gastronomic paradise. I think we could better exploit this and promote Adelaide as the perfect destination for gourmet travellers, or as a place to spend a gourmet weekend.

We sometimes forget how lucky we are to have such excellent, fresh produce and such equally excellent restaurants in the city.

Just to finish off, I would like to recommend Panacea on Halifax Street as another stylish Mediterranean restaurant that has recently opened in an 'exotic' location.

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Re: Food Thread

#63 Post by peas_and_corn » Fri May 08, 2009 7:53 pm

Best curry I have ever tried- go south from the giant Gepps Cross intersection down Main North rd, it's across the road from that shopping centre with the electronics/whitegoods store... you know the one, I can't remember the name. I remember going there with friends every friday night for a while (we worked at Coled Blair Athol) and we were the only white people there.

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Re: Food Thread

#64 Post by blackpointer » Sun May 31, 2009 9:43 pm

pizza-Melt thai-nu's ,-italian-auge, mex-little shop on the parade near european,greek-estia,chinese- spice temple syd,jap-shiki seafood-whiting at pauls is the best ask for well done chips

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Re: Food Thread

#65 Post by Will » Thu Aug 20, 2009 5:58 pm

From the Messenger:
Adelaide becoming centre for Indian cuisine

news Local News 19 Aug 09 @ 09:05am by Emily Charrison


ADELAIDE is fast coming into its own as a centre of authentic Indian cuisine, with the number of South Asian-style restaurants more than doubling in recent years.

At least 65 Indian food outlets now operate across Adelaide, including about 15 in town, compared with just a few dozen five years ago.

Restaurateur Naveen Irkulla who co-owns the popular British India in town and plans to open his fourth, Charminar, in Klemzig this week said the increasing number of British migrants to Australia had led to the curry boom.

``Indian food is getting popular because more migrants have come from the UK in the last five years,’’ he said. ``Their national food is chicken tikka.’’

Indian Australian Association of SA president Vikram Madan said there were also more Indians moving to Adelaide, with about 25,000 expats here.

``So many students are coming in and when they start assimilating to the new society they try different foods like Italian and Thai, but a lot of them also set up a restaurant of their own,’’ he said.

Indian cooking editor, author and teacher Promila Gupta said opening a restaurant was a popular way for migrants to ``make a living’’ particularly if they could not find another job.

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Re: Food Thread

#66 Post by Wayno » Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:12 pm

we've been to British India a few times now - very nice indeed, and reasonably priced too...
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

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Re: Food Thread

#67 Post by Will » Tue Oct 27, 2009 1:52 pm

I think its great albeit long overdue that the word is finally getting out that Adelaide is Australia's food and gourmet produce capital!

I was in a philosophical mood and realised that we do not need Guggenheim Museums, 300m towers or theme parks to atttract tourist here. Think about it. We can be the Tuscany of Australia. Tuscany does not have attractions which come to mind, yet it is a very popular destination for people to experience the amazing gourmet lifestyle that it offers.

From WA Today:
World on a plateOctober 24, 2009
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Enzo Fazzini from Enzo's Italian restaurant. Photo: David Mariuz
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David Sly traces the origins of the capital’s culinary culture.

Walking through the lively Adelaide Central Market provides a fascinating snapshot of the city's diverse culinary heritage. Only steps away from the 250 market stalls housed beneath one roof in the centre of the city, you can dine on authentic Mumbai tandoori goat, savour a steaming bowl of Vietnam's national dish, pho bo, graze on plates of Greek mezes or simply enjoy an unadulterated bowl of spaghetti bolognaise from a stall that first served this “exotic” dish to Adelaidians in 1957.

Such a culinary melting pot is a far cry from the state's sober colonial foundation, where prim British traditions of roast meats and sweet cakes were the staples of an inherited diet that barely considered the local climate. The rich diversity of what South Australians eat now has occurred only in the decades since World War II, when an assisted migration scheme brought 215,000 people from across Europe to South Australia – including large numbers of Italians, Greeks, Dutch, Polish, Balkans, Germans, Scandinavians and people from Baltic nations. Almost a quarter of South Australia's population was born overseas and each cultural group has brought its culinary traditions.

Italians established market gardens throughout Adelaide's suburbs (especially Lockleys, Findon, Newton and Campbelltown), while Greek and Croatian fishermen increased the variety and volume of the local seafood catch. Agricultural toil focused on what foods had been grown in their homelands. Before taking root in Adelaide's restaurant culture, however, such foods first became available at ethnic supermarkets in the suburbs. Many of these food emporiums are now revered institutions.

Imma and Mario's Mercato (625-627 Lower North East Road, Campbelltown, (08) 8337 8024) is an Italian superstore that, for 35 years, has stocked a huge selection of local and imported cheeses, antipasto, oils, vinegars, biscuits, chocolates, organic foods, fresh, dried and packaged goods and even kitchenware, with an on-site bakery and cafe that many visit for coffee, cake, breakfast and lunch. Hampers can also be sourced from Bottega Rotolo (7 Osmond Terrace, Norwood, (08) 8362 0455), a classy Italian providore boasting a huge refrigerated glass room filled with cheeses. Gaganis Brothers (9-13 Bacon Street, Hindmarsh, (08) 8346 5766) and Omega Fine Foods (33 Adam Street, Hindmarsh, (08) 8346 6499) are wholesalers that also sell everything from fresh, dried and tinned goods to giant spit barbecues and huge pots for authentic sauce making direct to the public.

As more diverse types of produce emerged, migrant cuisines soon influenced a new breed of restaurant. It started inconspicuously with a smattering of “continental” eateries: Allegro's Italian Cafe in Rundle Street (1947), Paprika Grill in Hindley Street (1952) and Lucia's Spaghetti Bar, which still operates in the Adelaide Central Market where Lucia and Pasquale Rosella served Adelaide's first pizza in 1957. Now, the Italian signature is everywhere – perhaps half of Adelaide's 1000 licensed eateries have some strain of Italian influence in their menu, from the fine dining elegance of Enoteca at the Adelaide Italian Club (262 Carrington Street, (08) 8227 0766) and Auge (22 Grote Street, (08) 8410 9332), to such smart ristorantes as Terranova (see story page 5) and Milano Cucina (80 Hutt Street, (08) 8227 0961).

Other migration waves have had a similarly profound effect on Adelaide dining tables. The Vietnam War triggered a large influx of Vietnamese and Cambodian immigrants, whose instant dismay at unfamiliar local food options saw them soon farming their own plots around Virginia and Two Wells, planting many different Asian herbs and vegetables.

Former South Australian premier Don Dunstan helped to promote the standing of Asian food in South Australia's culinary culture. In 1974 he encouraged the creation of market gardens at the Cadell correctional facility in South Australia's Riverland region to plant exotic trial crops, particularly vegetables and fruits from South-East Asia. Many of the successful crops were subsequently introduced to commercial market gardens and formed the genesis of the abundant harvest that is now evident in the Adelaide Central Market and weekly farmers' markets at Wayville, Willunga and the Barossa Valley.

When the familiar native foods of South-East Asia became readily available, neighbourhood eateries soon sprouted around a cluster of western suburbs where Asian refugees mostly lived, at Woodville, Ferryden Park and Pennington. This was true Vietnamese dining – no glitz, no glamour, no lingering at the formica tables but incredible freshness and authenticity to the dishes. The food was also very cheap, which is why such modest eateries as Pho Ba Ria, Vietnam, Nghi Ngan Quan and My Tho drew an appreciative crowd of Caucasians.

To satisfy the demands of a food-focused local Vietnamese community – and encouraged by the popularity of successful Asian supermarkets in the Chinatown precinct immediately west of the Adelaide Central Market – Viet grocers became larger and more expansive in suburbs ringing the city. The Asian Grocery at Torrensville (162 Henley Beach Road, nuzzled between a string of Italian and Greek eateries) and the Kilburn Asian Grocer (360a Prospect Road, Prospect) are now foodie landmarks and stock other Asian culinary exotica.

More recently, Adelaide has witnessed a surge in numbers of East African refugees and the subsequent emergence of a few key grocery stores – especially Sudanese refugee Isaac Rog's African Supermarket at 182 Prospect Road – and a string of homely cheap restaurants that ring the inner western and northern suburbs. These range from the Ethiopian soul food of Addis Ababa cafe and the Abyssinian Restaurant, to the flavours of modern Sudanese cuisine at Babanusa in Prospect with time-honoured recipes featuring okra, eggplant, lentils, fava beans, chickpeas, dates, garlic and sheep products from lamb to yoghurt.

The global tour continues through other Adelaide eat streets, from Tangritah Uyghur (112 Grote Street, city) presenting food traditions from the remote western tribes of China, to the Spanish El Choto (124 Port Road, Hindmarsh (08) 8346 1267).

The Adelaide melting pot has also yielded some lively unions of flavours and food styles. Malaysian-Chinese chef Cheong Liew led the charge with his fusion of Eastern and Western flavours at The Grange restaurant in the Hilton Adelaide. Many chefs have followed his lead in bustling restaurant strips along Gouger, Rundle and Hutt streets in the city, King William Road at Hyde Park, The Parade at Norwood and O'Connell Street in North Adelaide, where cultural harmony comes on a plate.

First Australian foods

Indigenous Australians taught colonial pioneers from the 1840s how to survive on native produce, yet it wasn't until the first Red Ochre Grill opened in 1985 that bush tucker became a culinary curiosity in Adelaide.

Chef Andrew Fielke started using wattle seed, lemon myrtle, bush tomatoes and quandongs as key flavourings in his dishes and their popularity spawned commercial production of native ingredients.

In the late 1990s, Andrew Beal of Australian Native Produce Industries started making inroads with large-scale production at Paringa in South Australia's Riverland. As well as producing the Red Ochre brand of sauces, condiments, fresh herbs and spices, he propagated new domestic citrus trees introducing the outback lime and blood lime.

These ingredients have moved beyond a novelty to become restaurant signatures, evident at the Red Ochre Restaurant. This large, elegant room perched above the banks of the River Torrens (War Memorial Drive, North Adelaide, (08) 8211 8555) has executive chef Ray Mauger being smart in his subtle use of pepper leaf, mountain pepper, lemon and aniseed myrtle, lemon aspen, warrigal greens and muntries in dishes of kangaroo, salt-and-pepper crocodile with prawns, or rich emu pate.

For a simpler introduction to bush flavours, try a wattleseed ice-cream from the Bush Tucker Ice-Cream van at the Adelaide Showground Farmers' Market (Leader Street, Wayville) each Sunday morning.

Suburban bites are the culinary delights

African

Babanusa (86 Prospect Road, Prospect, (08) 8342 1222) is said to be Australia's first Sudanese restaurant. For 15 years it has been a cultural focal point for swelling ranks of African migrants and locals who enjoy its laid-back atmosphere, often punctuated by African drums and xylophone. Chef Eddie Ahmed prepares simple dishes, with hefty soups providing an essential start to the meal: adass (red lentils with garlic), waika (dried okra with either lamb or chicken and herbs) and shorba (peanut paste soup).

Ethiopian food can be sampled in two distinct styles – from the homely Addis Ababa Cafe (462a Port Road, West Hindmarsh, (08) 8241 5185) where chef Yenesh Gbere adds a big pinch of spice to rustic dishes, to the funky vibe of Abyssinian Restaurant (126 Henley Beach Road, Torrensville, (08) 8443 4300) where Ras Mokonne evokes a cool atmosphere that feels more like a social club and serves such wholesome dishes as gomen (collard greens), kitfo (cardamom-spiced beef) and injer spongy bread.

Authentic Moroccan food is served at Marrakech (66 King William Road, Hyde Park, (08) 8299 9901), where fez-wearing chef Mohammed cooks fragrant tagine with couscous, presented in an appropriate setting with low tables and plush cushions.

Vietnamese

To taste Vietnamese pho bo at its simplest and most pristine, try Pho Ba Ria 2 (54c Hanson Road, Woodville Gardens, (08) 8244 5522). The place is not fancy to look at but it's what's in the bowl that matters and this is the genuine article: a clutch of condiments on every table – Hoisin, fish, chilli and soy sauces, chilli oil and brown vinegar – allows you to season the rich beef broth as you see fit. There are other delights to savour, including minced prawns wrapped around sugar cane skewers and a luxurious soup of roast duck with egg noodles.

Vietnam (73 Addison Road, Pennington, (08) 8447 3395) is the long-standing institution that introduced Adelaide diners to authentic Vietnamese food and still doesn't disappoint. Favourites include warm seafood salad served with glass vermicelli noodles, steamed prawns, scallops and squid; barbecued quails marinated in lemongrass and chilli; and crispy seafood dishes braised with ginger and fish sauce. The rice hot pots are a specialty.

Nghi Ngan Quan (34 Wright Street, Ferryden Park, (08) 8244 6003) is a big, open restaurant that attracts Vietnamese migrants from surrounding suburbs and has a menu of more than 100 dishes, most costing less than $10 a serve. Shredded pork cold rolls and the hot sour soup with taro are superb.

My Tho (183B Hanson Road, Athol Park, (08) 8243 0585) produces southern regional Vietnamese dishes true to the Mekong Delta area – clean, delicious soups ranging from chicken sweetcorn to chicken fungus mushroom and shark fin and crabmeat; a cluster of goat dishes; and salt-and-pepper flounder with chilli, garlic and ginger.

Italian

So much Italian culinary influence has been absorbed into slick contemporary cafe culture that it's comforting to still find some old-fashioned ristorante hospitality in Adelaide's inner-western suburbs. At Hindmarsh, Enzo's Ristorante (308 Port Road, (08) 8346 2786) offers classic Italian flavour, with soccer shirts on the walls, murals of the homeland and genial host Enzo Fazzari serving fabulous authentic Italian food. Capturing authenticity in simple dishes is also the mantra of Terranova Ristorante (170 Henley Beach Road, Torrensville, (08) 8352 1822), run by the Vorrasi family, who also own the superb O'Furno Bakery next door. Chef Edoardo Strappa makes a fist of classics from bistecca Fiorentina to spaghetti vongole.

Greek

Kefi Greek Cuisine (61 Tapleys Hill Road, Glenelg North, (08) 8350 9199) embraces the classic taverna style of Greek dining with robust enthusiasm. Generous to a fault (portions verge on excessive), this small restaurant is always crowded, attracting hungry diners eager for superb meats that are chargrilled to remain moist and succulent, especially the quail and lamb, and a glorious seafood psarika.

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Re: Food Thread

#68 Post by Wayno » Tue Oct 27, 2009 2:45 pm

Will wrote:I think its great albeit long overdue that the word is finally getting out that Adelaide is Australia's food and gourmet produce capital!
My wife's sister and her family from Perth visited us a couple of weeks ago. They are most upset that Perth does not rate (gastronomically) compared to Adelaide. They also lament the fact we have better beer gardens and open spaces to relax compared to themselves.

My Bro-in-law said (approx quote):
You guys are so lucky - everything is so close together, yet there's a tremendous feeling of space - don't ever lose that
He also said
Adelaide has such diversity - From Western Beaches, To Eastern luxury, The Hills are quaint - almost a world away. It's like you have a great collection of subcultures
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

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Re: Food Thread

#69 Post by vik_man » Wed Oct 28, 2009 1:42 am

Estia (greek) on Henley Square is possibly my favourite restaurant in Australia

it turned me in to a HUGE fan of greek food.

They also have a kiosk bar during the day where they sell fish and chips, ice cream etc.
One of my favourite things is the kolokittie(sp?) yiros.

some other places I like:

Italian:
European Cafe (norwood parade). the best, most authentic italian food i've ever had. and if you like vibrancy, this place is absolutely BUSTLING every night of the week

Thai:
Star of Siam and Nu's (both on gouger st)

Mexican:
Cha Chi's (glen osmond rd). I don't have much to compare this to, but this is the only place we go to for Mexican and the food is always great

Vegetarian:
Zenhouse, Thea, Vegetarian Garden..all in the city. Vegetarian Delight in Hindmarsh. My family has been to Vegetarian Delight ssssooooooooo many times over the years, that i'm starting to get sick of it. But the food is truly amazing. I am so happy to have this place in Adelaide.

Vietnamese:
Vietnam Restaurant (addison rd). Went here for an engagement party once and the food was brilliant.

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Re: Food Thread

#70 Post by Will » Tue Jul 27, 2010 12:30 am

I found this article on the Australian.

It is great that the word on the quality of food in Adelaide is reaching the nation. We are definately punching above our weight in regard to food!
Mangan sprinkles Salt on Orchard Road

From: The Australian July 20, 2010 12:00AM I

SYDNEY'S Luke Mangan is the latest Australian chef to plant our flag in Singapore.
Mangan, of Glass Brasserie at Sydney's Hilton, will do a Salt Grill at the ION Orchard building, on Orchard Road, with a projected opening date of October. He joins Sydney's Tetsuya Wakuda, who opened Waku Ghin several months ago, flying the Aussie banner alongside a rollcall of stars including Mario Batali and Daniel Boulud at the Marina Bay Sands resort. Salt Grill will be a 140-seater and adds to Mangan's growing clutch of restaurant interests in Tokyo, Melbourne (The Palace) and on the high seas, with another Salt Grill due to begin trading on a third P&O cruise liner later this year.

ONE of America's most admired chef-restaurateurs, Tom Colicchio of the Craft restaurant group, slipped into our country last week on a whirlwind visit sponsored by SA Tourism. Colicchio, last here seven years ago to cook at a Sydney fundraiser organised by his mate Neil Perry, has been commissioned by South Australia to run a series of dinners later this year in New York and Los Angeles showcasing SA produce. He visited the CleanSeas tuna operation at Port Lincoln but was particularly taken with Kangaroo Island, visiting marron, poultry and lamb producers. Colicchio heaped praise on the food of Jed Archdeacon, the relatively new head chef at Southern Ocean Lodge. "He has a very light touch," said Colicchio.


AN oyster farm in SA's Coffin Bay is the big winner in the 2010 Produce Awards by Delicious magazine. Pristine Oysters, run by brothers Tony, Brendan and Nick Guidera, was named producer of the year and winner of the From the Sea category last night in Melbourne. It was a good night for SA. The Australian Caper Company, based at Mannum, won the category From the Earth; the regional award went to McLaren Vale; and for outstanding use of regional produce by a chef, the winner is David Swain of Fino restaurant in Willunga. Victorian winners include wagyu specialist David Blackmore (From the Paddock) and Holy Goat (From the Dairy). Also from Victoria, cheesemaker Richard Thomas was recognised for his outstanding contribution to Australian food, while the Collingwood Children's Farm Farmers Market was recognised as Australia's finest. In NSW, Rob Moxham of Broken Bay Oysters won the Slow Food award for heritage/sustainability while niche trade supplier Feather and Bone was named outstanding supplier. From Queensland, Midyim Eco Pimientos were named best new product and Spanner Crabs Noosa won the award for consistently excellent product.

LAST week, Holy Goat was named the best agricultural producer for 2010 by the Royal Agricultural Society of NSW, pocketing $10,000 and the RAS President's Medal.

WHEN Fig Ristorante opened in Adelaide's Gouger Street late last year with a lavish fit-out, it was tipped as the next big thing. Wrong. Fig is closed but the real excitement is about the chef who has bought the place. Ayhan Erkoc made waves at The Manse as Adelaide's most adventurous chef, and, since returning from Melbourne, where he flirted with a few business ideas, has taken the Fig site with plans for Celsius Restaurant and Bar, which he hopes will be Adelaide's version of Sydney's Bentley. Erkoc is doing it with his brother, Kasim, and plans to source as much produce as possible from their parents' farm outside town. Celsius's first menu features entrees priced at about $20 and mains averaging $34: progressive dining is in for a real shot in the arm in SA. Celsius opens on August 3.

HYDE Park (Adelaide) restaurateur Simon Kardachi (The Pot/Melt) has expansion plans that will take him into Adelaide's CBD. Kardachi is set to sign the lease on a refurbished period building in Waymouth Street where he can establish another Melt. "It's a long time since Waymouth had good eating at night and I think the time's right," says Kardachi, who also plans a second Waymouth Street lease next door to establish a "mini Rockpool", a beef and seafood grill. The precinct is warming.

SOUTHBANK (Melbourne) glamourpuss Left Bank, owned by Emirates Leisure, has made a personnel change early in the restaurant's life. Executive chef James Tan has left, barely seven months into his tenure. The restaurant says two head chefs already on deck will fill the void

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Re: Food Thread

#71 Post by Queen Anne » Tue Jul 27, 2010 7:38 pm

That's interesting. Tom Colicchio is really, really famous in America due to the huge success of his show Top Chef.

http://www.bravotv.com/top-chef
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Colicchio

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Re: Food Thread

#72 Post by chrism4549 » Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:20 pm

Queen Anne wrote:That's interesting. Tom Colicchio is really, really famous in America due to the huge success of his show Top Chef.

http://www.bravotv.com/top-chef
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Colicchio
Absolutely. And he has credibility unlike Gordon Ramsay who just known here for theatrics (who, BTW, is hosting Masterchef USA, series premiere starting tonight). There are only a handful of guys in Tom Colicchio's league in the US that I can think of. Big win for your tourism if you will be using him.

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Re: Food Thread

#73 Post by chrism4549 » Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:00 am

Sorry for the double-post. Here's the article on Tom Colicchio's visit.

http://www.unlimitedflightstoaustralia. ... es&cmsid=9

I thought they, um, could hired a real photographer or something. I think I could take better pics with my iphone.

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Re: Food Thread

#74 Post by Wayno » Sun Jun 19, 2011 10:55 am

Anyone know of a good quality Tapas restaurant in the city or nearby?
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

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Re: Food Thread

#75 Post by Will » Sun Jun 19, 2011 11:35 am

Wayno wrote:Anyone know of a good quality Tapas restaurant in the city or nearby?
Funny, you ask, because I was about to post a review for a new tapas bar at Semaphore!

I dined there last night, and it was superb. I rate it with the best Spanish restaurants in Sydney, with the benefit of Adelaide prices!

Here are the details:

http://www.urbanspoon.com/r/336/1569219 ... -Semaphore

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