News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#586 Post by PeFe » Thu Sep 19, 2019 12:51 pm

Another big battery coming to South Australia, at the Solar River project
From Renew Economy
GE to supply world’s biggest battery for South Australia Solar River project

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The supplier of what has been touted as “one of the largest” grid-connected batteries in the world, to be installed alongside the 200MW Solar River Project in South Australia, has been revealed as GE Renewable Energy.

In an announcement on Thursday, GE said it had been selected to supply and integrate a 100MW/300MWh big battery for the 200MW solar PV plant.

By our calculations, if built now, it would be the biggest lithium ion battery in the world, besting the Tesla big battery at nearby Hornsdale which stands at 100MW/129MWh. However, other big batteries may beat it to the title before it is completed as several are under construction in the US.

Construction of the Solar River Project is due to get underway by Christmas this year, after its developers snared a power purchase agreement with major utility, Alinta Energy.

That deal, announced in July, locked in finance for the $480 million project, which is being developed by Jason May and Richard Winter near Robertstown, in South Australia’s mid-north, the starting point for the proposed new inter-connector to NSW.

The company has not disclosed the financial details of the 15-year PPA, but told RenewEconomy at the time that the deal with Hong Kong-owned Alinta was for 75 per cent of the solar farm’s output, making Solar River “very bankable.”

At that time, the supplier of the battery system remained a mystery, but May, who is the Solar River Project CEO, suggested the decision had already been made.

“This is the first purpose-built PV battery system in the world,” he told RE. “It’s never been deployed before, but because of who (the company supplying the battery) are, it can be banked.”

In comments this week, May said locking in GE as the supplier of the big battery system marked another major milestone for the project.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/ge-to-suppl ... ect-36210/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#587 Post by PeFe » Thu Sep 19, 2019 1:14 pm

It looks like the proposed Highbury pumped hydro project in the Adelaide hills has failed according to The Advertiser.

https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/subscrib ... uffix=45-a

I cant get past their paywall (and I dont want to subscribe) so I wonder if there is any kind person out there that can post the article for me?

Thanks in advance.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#588 Post by Llessur2002 » Thu Sep 19, 2019 1:29 pm

That'll be $7.99 thanks.
Plans for a $440 million pumped hydro energy plant at a long-disused Highbury quarry have been abandoned.

Tilt Renewables, operator of the Snowtown wind farm, launched the venture in February last year with hopes its construction would generate 300 jobs.

The company said at the time a 300MW hydro storage at Highbury could add a “substantial level of security” to the state’s electricity supply and would be “a real winner for the South Australian community”.

However, Tilt Renewables chief executive Deion Campbell told The Messenger today its option on the site had expired last month.

It had made “no progress” with landowner and project partner Holcim.

“It is dead,” Mr Campbell said of the Highbury plan.

“Technical due diligence on the site indicated it was not a feasible pumped-hydro location, especially when compared to others in the region.”

Confirming the decision to call off the project, Tilt managing director Nigel Baker said its partnership with Holcim was not as fruitful as had been hoped.

“Under current circumstances with our arrangements with Holcim, it wasn’t looking viable,” he said.

“We’re flogging a dead horse, it’s time to give up on it.

“It’s not the most competitive one (hydro scheme) in South Australia.

“We are competing with others. There’s space for a relative small number of them. Each new one will be harder to justify.”
From: https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/messenge ... 3c97fe3ba3

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#589 Post by PeFe » Thu Sep 19, 2019 10:11 pm

Llessur2002 wrote:
Thu Sep 19, 2019 1:29 pm
That'll be $7.99 thanks.
The cheque is in the mail.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#590 Post by Goodsy » Fri Sep 20, 2019 8:11 pm

a short ad interesting video on a pumped storage plant in the UK, if everyone is interested

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Jx_bJgIFhI

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#591 Post by PeFe » Tue Sep 24, 2019 1:25 pm

Really interesting article from Renew Economy discussing integrating South Australia's wind and solar resources into a possible future hydrogen based fuel society.

If you don't understand what a "hydrogen based economy" is, then this the article for you.
South Australia unveils plans for 100% renewable hydrogen economy
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South Australia has outlined plans for a 100 per cent renewable hydrogen economy, saying that its enormous wind and solar resources, saying there is nowhere else in the world as well positioned to produce, consume and export 100% green hydrogen.

The plan was unveiled at an international hydrogen conference that began in Adelaide on Tuesday, in a state that is already sourcing well over 50 per cent of its electricity needs from wind and solar and which is on track to reach “net 100 per cent renewables” before 2030 and go well beyond that in the following decade.

Just last week, the Germany-Australian Energy Transition Hub talked of “200 per cent renewables” as the most economic and effective plan to provide renewable power for electricity, transport and buildings, and to build an export industry. It seems South Australia will inevitably be the first to get there.

The state’s Liberal government says the hydrogen plan will boost the economy and future jobs opportunities. Renewable hydrogen, driven by the plunging costs of wind and solar and hydrogen electrolyser technology will allow the world to “rethink” ways to generate and store energy, power transport fleets and heat homes, and to provide a huge multi billion dollar export market.

“This initiative fits in perfectly with our plan to help deliver more reliable, more affordable and cleaner energy for our state,” says energy minister Dan van Holst Pellekaan.

“It’s likely that nowhere else in the world is as well positioned as South Australia to produce, consume and export 100% green hydrogen.

“Some of our longest-standing and closest trading partners are signalling that they will need hydrogen to make their energy transitions over coming decades, and we want to make the most of that growth opportunity by becoming a hub for the export of renewable energy.”

Indeed, chief scientist Alan Finkel and his team has been working on an Australian hydrogen strategy, which he will finally get to formally present in late November when the COAG energy ministers meet for the first time this year, although he has been briefing state authorities in recent months.

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Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/south-austr ... omy-58723/
Also another article from Renew Economy discussing a trial of "solar-predictor" technology for solar farms.....ie when will ths sun shine and how much electricity will we make...

https://reneweconomy.com.au/tailem-bend ... ogy-10046/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#592 Post by PeFe » Thu Sep 26, 2019 2:42 pm

Neoen (majority owner of Hornsdale Power Reserve ie the big battery at Jamestown) has released a financial statement detailing their last 6 months earnings. A few interesting insights about the economics and earning capacity of renewables.
From Renew Economy
Tesla big battery “still operating superbly” as profits maintained in last six months

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French renewable energy and battery storage company Neoen says its wholly owned Tesla big battery next to the Hornsdale wind farm in South Australia is operating “superbly” and has maintained its unexpectedly high profits in the latest half year period.

The 100MW/129MWh Tesla big battery – officially known as the Hornsdale Power Reserve – opened in late 2017 after being built in less than 100 days (as promised by Tesla boss and co-founder Elon Musk) and requested by the then South Australia Labor government.

It remains the world’s biggest lithium-ion battery and has impressed not just network owners and grid operators with its overall performance, and and speed and versatility and ability to hold up the grid in the case of wider outages, but also the investment community with the scope of the financial returns delivered. It has also delivered more than $50 million in grid savings in its first year.

The earnings for its first six months of operations were revealed last year when Neoen filed a prospectus for a stock exchange listing, which said that the Tesla battery – which cost $91 million – earned $A13 million in the first six months, including $A2 million from the South Australia contract and a further $A10.8 million from the sale of stored electricity from the Hornsdale battery.

Most of this market revenue came from the FCAS market, with the battery earning $A7.1 million from the sale of FCAS. For the whole year, the Tesla big battery delivered a profit of $22 million for Neoen.

Neoen released its results overnight but delivered surprisingly little detail, and did not publish, as it said it would, its detailed financial accounts.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/tesla-big-b ... ths-12943/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#593 Post by PeFe » Mon Sep 30, 2019 1:46 pm

Article from Renew Economy describing pilot project where power from renewables is used to make hydrogen, which is blended with natural gas, in turn producing electricity......
Adelaide steps closer to renewable hydrogen as electrolyser approved for Tonsley

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Adelaide is one step closer to supplying at least part of its mains gas network with renewable hydrogen after the installation of an electrolyser proposed by gas network distributer Australian Gas Networks gained the green light from the South Australian Government.

Development approval has been granted for the $11.4 million Hydrogen Park SA facility, to be built in the Tonsley Innovation District in the south of Adelaide as part of a project to demonstrate the potential for renewable gas to be supplied to homes and businesses. Australian Gas Networks expects to produce the first renewable hydrogen at the site by mid-2020.

The facility will include a 1.25MW electrolyser, which will produce hydrogen gas using electricity, with Australian Gas Networks matching the electricity use with the purchase and voluntary surrender of renewable energy certificates.

Hydrogen will be produced using a proton exchange membrane electrolyser, powered with renewable electricity, splitting water into its hydrogen and oxygen gas components.

The hydrogen produced at the facility will be blended into the main gas network, replacing around 5 per cent of the natural gas supply with renewable hydrogen.

“Renewable hydrogen will comprise no more than 5% of the total blended renewable gas volume to be supplied to parts of Mitchell Park. The characteristics of the blended 5% renewable gas are consistent with the Australian Standard for natural gas supply,” Australian Gas Networks said in a statement.

By limiting the blending of the renewable hydrogen to 5 per cent of the mains gas supply, Australian Gas Networks is confident that customers will not notice any difference in their supply, and will require no modifications to gas appliances.

Skeptics also wonder if it will produce enough change in the emissions profile of the gas network.
The gas industry, however, sees the “image” of renewable hydrogen, even it amounts to a fraction of total supply, as integral to the future business model of gas networks.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/adelaide-st ... ley-90314/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#594 Post by PeFe » Mon Oct 07, 2019 11:49 pm

Battery at Lake Bonney wind farm delayed.
From Renew Economy
New Tesla big battery at Lake Bonney wind farm delayed again

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The second Tesla big battery planned for South Australia next to the 275MW Lake Bonney wind farm has suffered more delays and will not likely come into service until six months after the installation was completed.

The 25MW/52MWh battery being installed at Lake Bonney by listed renewable energy developer Infigen Energy is less than half the size of the first Tesla big battery, officially known as the Hornsdale Power Reserve, and located next to the Hornsdale wind farms operated by Neoen Australia.

The Lake Bonney battery to have come into service earlier this year, but Infigen said in May that while the “physical installation” of the $38 million battery was substantially complete (see image above), including the inverters and related balance of plant, connection issues were still being worked through.

It was thought then that the commissioning would be complete in the September quarter but that has now passed. The latest indication from Infigen Energy in recent statements, without further explanation, is for the connection to be complete by the end of calendar 2019.

Infigen will be keen for the battery to start operation. The battery – like its predecessor at Hornsdale – will tap into the frequency and ancillary services market, and will also be used to “firm” its supply contracts with commercial and industrial customers.

It will also mean it can continue to generate and store electricity during negative prices on the wholesale market.

On Saturday, both the Lake Bonney 1 and the Lake Bonney 2 wind farms (blue and green lines in graph below) switched off for more than six hours from around 7am to 1pm when wholesale prices turned negative, presumably because they had no customers over the long weekend.

A similar shutdown of Lake Bonney 1 and 2 occcurred on Monday, also a public holiday, as prices went negative again.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/new-tesla-b ... ain-43005/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#595 Post by PeFe » Fri Oct 11, 2019 2:20 pm

More on Lake Bonney battery.
From Renew Economy
Infigen says Lake Bonney big battery energised and registered

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Listed renewable energy developer and operator Infigen Energy says its delayed battery storage installation at Lake Bonney in South Australia has been energised, and registered with the Australian Energy Market Operator.

Infigen says in its latest monthly report that the 25MW/52MWh big battery next to the Lake Bonney wind farms should be commissioned by the end of the year.

As RenewEconomy reported earlier this week, the Lake Bonney battery has been repeatedly delayed despite being largely complete – in construction terms – in May. Infigen said in May that it should be commissioned in the September quarter, but more delays pushed it into the current quarter.

The Lake Bonney battery will be the third “big battery” in South Australia, and the second to use Tesla technology. The original “Tesla big battery” was installed at the Hornsdale wind farm by Neoen nearly two years ago, while the Dalrymple big battery was installed last year next to the Wattle Point wind farm by AGL.

Another big battery, at the Lincoln Gap wind farm near Port Augusta, is awaiting commissioning, while a whole series of larger batteries have been proposed elsewhere in the state, including by Sanjeev Gupta in Port Augusta, Neoen at Crystal Brook and South Goyder, and Alinta has signed up for a huge solar and battery project near Robertstown.

Infigen expects the Lake Bonney battery to tap into the frequency control and ancillary services market, help it “firm” up its wind output to secure more contracts in the commercial and industrial sector, and to store excess wind power at other times.

Over the last long weekend, both the Lake Bonney 1 and 2 wind farms were switched off for long periods because the wholesale prices fell well below zero, meaning that the company would have had to pay for others to take the output, rather than store it in a battery.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/infigen-say ... red-97423/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#596 Post by PeFe » Mon Oct 14, 2019 10:34 am

We will be seeing a lot headlines like this one.
From Renew Economy
Solar reaches 80 per cent share of demand in South Australia on Saturday

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Solar power continues to set stunning new milestones in the renewable state of South Australia, reaching 80 per cent of total demand on Saturday and accounting for more than 70 per cent of demand over four hours in the middle of the day.

The 80 per cent share (well, 79.6 per cent actually, but we are rounding up) was reached at 1.10pm (network time, AEST) on Saturday, with rooftop solar providing the bulk of the output – 819MW or 63 per cent of state demand – and utility scale solar (Bungala 1, Tailem Bend and the partially complete Bungala 2) providing a combined 219MW, or 17 per cent.

While that took solar’s total share of demand to 80 per cent at 1.10pm, according to the OpenNem website, its share of total generation at that time was closer to 66 per cent (see second graph), with just over a quarter of the total coming from gas generation. The excess over state demand was exported to Victoria, as it was for most of the week.

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The interesting thing about this new milestone is that it means it will not be long until solar output is high enough during some daytime hours to meet all the state’s demand. Bungala 2 is currently on a “hold point” position (as it has been for a long time), that limits its output to around 20MW.

But if and when Bungala 2 satisfies AEMO requirements and reaches its its full rating of 120MW, and Sanjeev Gupta’s 280MW Cultana solar farm comes on line, and more rooftop solar is added, as is inevitable, then the total output of solar will inevitably exceed total demand on some occasions. AEMO has warned that rooftop solar alone could do that within a few years.

Given the new wind farms being built (including the 214MW Lincoln Gap), it will be interesting to see what happens to the gas generation when the four synchronous condensers are installed next year by ElectraNet.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/solar-reach ... day-32409/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#597 Post by PeFe » Mon Oct 21, 2019 11:11 pm

Another solar headline
From Renew Economy
Rooftop solar pushes South Australia grid demand to new record low

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Rooftop solar has helped push operational grid demand in the renewable state of South Australia down to a new record low of 475MW, according to a new update from the Australian Energy Market Operator.

The new low in operational demand (the red dotted line in graph above) occurred on Sunday at 1230pm (grid time, which is AEST), just over a week after rooftop solar and large scale solar combined to deliver 80 per cent of the state’s total demand, on Saturday, October 12, and a week after the state had apparently set a previous record low.

“This is the second week in a row that a new record for South Australia’s minimum operational demand has been set, and a strong sign of just how quickly Australia’s energy industry is transforming,” AEMO says in a blog post on its Energy Live website.

AEMO defines operational demand as the amount of power consumers require from Australia’s wholesale energy markets. This does not include power generated by behind-the-meter resources, like rooftop PV, which AEMO noted has already proven itself as a key driver behind these new records, along with energy efficiency.

“At the time of the new record, rooftop solar was generating approximately 821 megawatts of power, which equalled 64% of the total demand required in South Australia. If you add in power generated by utility solar and wind generation, approximately 90% of the state’s native demand was met by renewable sources,” said AEMO’s Chief Operations Officer, Damien Sanford.

Sanford noted that rooftop solar usually has its maximum output during the middle of the day, when most people are not at home, and minimum demand levels are often set in spring, when mild weather combines with clear and sunny conditions that are ideal for rooftop solar.

AEMO said, however, that the growing share of rooftop solar created challenges for managing key system requirements such as frequency and voltage.

AEMO has been working with network and consumer groups to find a way to make rooftop solar and other distributed resources, such as battery storage and electric vehicles, more “visible” so it can be better managed.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/rooftop-sol ... low-13041/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#598 Post by PeFe » Tue Oct 22, 2019 2:39 pm

Another small solar farm has started operating in South Australia.
Meralli rolls out another “small but smart” solar farm in South Australia

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Another small, but smart and battery-ready solar farm has been completed by developers Meralli Solar in South Australia, with the installation of the 8.9MW (DC) Baroota project in just eight weeks.

The project, in Port Germein in the state’s Spencer Gulf region, used the Belectric PEG frame system favoured by Meralli, which allows for rapid installation and a much reduced environmental impact.

Once installed, the PV panels – in this case, 23,200 of them – sit less than a metre high and require no concrete footings. The solar farm – which was financed by a group of local investors, including landholders and farmers – is also battery ready.

“The Baroota project offered us the opportunity to build our own distributed energy project, demonstrating what is possible at a local level,” said Jeff Packer, managing director of Watt Power Brokers.

“We anticipate battery storage as the energy landscape evolves. No multi-nationals here; just Australians finding a better way!” he said.

“We believe the PEG system, in particular the Meralli ‘version,’ represents a more sensible and sustainable use of resources in deploying solar photovoltaics. We had considered a single-axis tracker but at the end of the day PEG was a ‘no-brainer’ for us!”

The completion of Baroota follows last month’s electrification of Meralli’s 9MW Kanowna solar farm near Moree, in New South Wales, described as “cutting edge” for its use of both DC optimisers and DC coupled battery architecture for central inverters.

As GIles Parkinson has noted, the combination means it can get by the restrictions being imposed by network operators, and maximise the output of both the solar farm and any battery storage, which can then be sent to the grid at times of peak demand or in the evening.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/meralli-rol ... lia-94885/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#599 Post by PeFe » Wed Oct 23, 2019 12:45 am

Chinese battery maker has set up a "virtual power plant" in South Australia, bring the number in the state to five.
From One Step Off The Grid
Alpha-ESS to set up fifth solar + battery virtual power plant in South Australia

South Australia adds a fifth virtual power plant to its grid this week with the launch of a joint effort from ShineHub and energy retailer Powershop, backed by a special deal with battery maker Alpha-ESS.

The VPP is the latest in South Australia to be launched off the back of the state’s Home Battery Scheme, which offers solar households a $6,000 subsidy on battery storage as long as they agree to participate in grid-coordinated scheme.

It joins four other virtual power plant offerings currently available in the South Australian market from AGL, Simply Energy, Telsa and sonnen.

The ShineHub scheme offers participants an extra $1,000 discount off the cost of an Alpha-ESS battery on top of the subsidy – to coincide with the launch of the battery maker’s new assembly plant in Adelaide.

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Alpha-ESS says it plans to increase its production of batteries to around 500 systems per month for the rest of the year – presumably to cater to demand generated by the VPP – and then ramp up again to 1000 systems a month in 2019.

The China-based company says it currently has more than 20,000 residential and commercial systems running in more than 40 countries globally. In Australia, 5,000-plus systems have so-far been installed.

The battery sizes offered include 5.5kWh at around $9,000 without any discounts of subsidies, 11kWh for around $14,000; and 16.5kWh ( more than $17,220).

“As one of the pioneer manufacturers in the energy storage market in South Australia, we are
pleased Alpha-ESS is expanding its production outfit, providing a boost for local jobs and
industries,” said South Australia energy minister Dan van Holst Pellekaan.

“Alpha-ESS set up in Australia in 2015 and committed to assembling its batteries in South Australia in November 2018, following the establishment of the state government’s Home Battery Scheme.”

ShineHub CEO Alex Georgiou said its mission was to help make solar and battery technology affordable and accessible for all South Australians.

“We’ve managed to develop a scheme that utilises locally assembled batteries and makes it cheaper for households to adopt solar and storage and reduce their power bills,” he said in comments on Wednesday.

https://onestepoffthegrid.com.au/south- ... alpha-ess/

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#600 Post by PeFe » Thu Oct 24, 2019 3:03 pm

South Australian government to re-tender electricity supply contract
From Renew economy
South Australia puts energy contract out for tender after failure of solar tower

The South Australia state government has re-launched its search for a new electricity supplier after being forced to go back to the market following the failure of the much-touted solar tower and molten salt storage project in Port Augusta.

The contract with US company SolarReserve was cancelled by South Australia earlier this year after the company failed to get finance.

SolarReserve is facing more problems after the Nevada state utility also reportedly pulled its contract with the ground-breaking 110MW Crescent Dunes facility for its failure to deliver on production targets.

On Thursday, state energy minister Dan van Holst Pellekaan issued a request for proposals for the supply of 100 per cent of the state government’s electricity needs, which amount to around 500 gigawatt hours a year and includes office buildings, police stations, schools and hospitals.

“The Marshall Government’s priority is a contract that delivers lower cost electricity whilst improving competition in the South Australian energy market and reducing pollution,” van Holst Pellekaan said in a statement.

“The State Government’s electricity contract represents an opportunity to deliver more affordable, reliable and cleaner electricity in South Australia whilst securing the successful bidder’s long term future in this state.”

The RFP allows for proposals for retail contracts, the construction of a new generating plant or combinations that meet the state’s requirements.

The State’s procurement objectives are: the supply of electricity for 100 per cent of the government’s electricity load; the lowest cost to SA Government; and improved innovation and competition in wholesale and retail electricity markets in South Australia.

The RFP will be the first of a two stage process that will see shortlisted respondents invited to respond to a selective Request for Tender (RFT) in the first quarter of 2020.

The state government currently has a retail electricity contract with Simec Energy Australia, majority owned by UK steel billionaire and Whyalla steelworks owner Sanjeev Gupta, which lasts until October 2020, with a provision to extend until 2021 if needed.

Full article : https://reneweconomy.com.au/south-austr ... wer-85555/

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