PRO: Point Lowly Seaport

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Re: New deepwater port in Northern Spencer Gulf

#16 Post by Ho Really » Tue May 20, 2008 12:09 pm

rhino wrote:It could be, and probably will be, at Port Bonython, but from what I have read it cannot be the same jetty, due to the very sensitive (explosive) nature of what is currently shipped from that jetty. Also the storage area inside the fence at Port Bonython is fully taken up with tanks, plant, and buildings for the liquids port, which means that there will be a large expansion of the site and a new jetty required.

Given those parameters, it is also likely that a new port, not far away (perhaps to the north of Point Lowly?) is on the cards.
Yes, of course, also you wouldn't want an ore-carrier colliding with one of those tankers!! I've looked at my hydrographic charts and I guess it is possible to have a jetty north of Point Lowly as the water there is still deep enough (15 to 20 metres). This would be on a different approach to the new jetty with new additional navigational aids required.

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PRO: Point Lowly Seaport

#17 Post by Norman » Wed Sep 17, 2008 10:32 pm

DTEI Website is now up: http://dtei.sa.gov.au/infrastructure/ppld
A number of projects have been proposed for development on the Point Lowly Peninsula. The South Australian Government plans to make 500 hectares of industrial zoned land available for these proposed developments in the vicinity of the SANTOS facility.

The following outlines the proposed developments, including the requirements for consultation and environmental assessments, and answers some of the most commonly asked questions.
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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#18 Post by Omicron » Wed Sep 17, 2008 10:52 pm

I can honestly say I've never heard of the Point Lowly Peninsula.

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#19 Post by rhino » Thu Sep 18, 2008 11:44 am

Omicron wrote:I can honestly say I've never heard of the Point Lowly Peninsula.
Point Lowly is the point in the bottom right hand corner of that photo, and hosts a lighthouse that is out of the picture. The jetty in the bottom middle of the photo, and the refinery-looking complex on shore, is Port Bonython, the gas and liquids port about 30km east-north-east of Whyalla. The point of land to the left of the little bay is Stony Point. There are safety issues with using the existing jetty to ship out minerals, hence the new jetty proposed. The bay in the right of the photo is Fitzgerald Bay and currently hosts a lot of shacks along its shore. To the north of this area is the old army base, which stretches all the way to El Alamein (and Baxter Detention Centre) near Port Augusta.
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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#20 Post by rhino » Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:12 pm

Stuart's diesel plant fast-tracked

CHRISTOPHER RUSSELL, BUSINESS EDITOR
January 28, 2009 11:30pm


STUART Petroleum aims to begin construction of its Port Bonython diesel project late this year.
"It's looking very positive,'' managing director Tino Guglielmo said yesterday in announcing an allocation of $2 million to complete planning and approvals of the Eyre Peninsula project.
Mr Guglielmo was confident of strong demand for diesel despite the economic slowdown. Projects such as the Olympic Dam expansion, Prominent Hill and Iluka's mineral sands mine were strong drivers, he said.
"The state really needs this facility, it's long overdue,'' he said.
Stuart holds an 85 per cent stake in the Port Bonython Fuels Project in a joint venture with the Scott Group.
Stage 1 of the project involves building fuel landing, storage and loading facilities at an estimated cost of $45 million to $50 million. It will take 15 to 18 months to build with fuel to be sourced from refineries in South East Asia.
The project would make the supply chain more efficient and more reliable and ``should translate to a lower cost'' of diesel.
Mr Guglielmo said Stuart also was accelerating development studies of its Oliver oil field in the Timor Sea. It aims to drill an appraisal well late this year or early in 2010.
The projects are being funded by cash flow from Cooper Basin interests.
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Rhino

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#21 Post by rhino » Tue Mar 03, 2009 9:53 am

From today's Adelaide Now:

Whyalla board backs Bonython deep port
SARAH MARTIN
March 03, 2009 11:15pm


THE Whyalla Economic Development Board is backing the Port Bonython minerals export proposal, saying it is esssential for jobs growth in the region.
The project has caused much controversy in the Whyalla community and last month the council voted not to support the proposal in its present form.
The project involves the development of a deep-water commodities export harbour to support the region's burgeoning resources industry.
The council has said it wants to see the port moved to an alternative site to avoid environmental damage to the area which is a cuttlefish breeding ground.
However, WEDB chief executive Steve Arndt said the council's position was based on the views of a vocal minority.
He said the business community of Whyalla supported the proposal which would guarantee jobs for "decades to come".
"I don't know if there is a large amount of community concern - we are talking about maybe 100 people out of 22,500 people and as always minorities can be rather vocal on issues such as this," he said.
"I am putting the message out from the business community that we support this project - it is about creating new jobs in the future and creating a pipeline of activity for the region."
Mr Arndt said the present site was the most appropriate location for the deep-water port, and the council's alternative site was not feasible.
"In order to move the project further south the indications are that we will be looking at at least twice the cost, and if that is the case then it is unlikely to happen," he said.
Mr Arndt said the proponent, Spencer Gulf PortLink Consortium, should be given a chance to address some of the concerns raised by the Council.
SPGL will lodge a feasibility study report to the Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure next week, with a briefing for potential users of the port planned for the week of March 16.
Western Plains Resources, a potential user of the port, is keen to see the project go ahead.
In a statement to the Australian Securities Exchange yesterday, the company said it was concerned the consortium would delay the project.
"WPR does not accept that SGPL should be granted what amounts to a free option to develop the port according to its own timetable," the company stated.
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Rhino

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#22 Post by Wayno » Tue Mar 03, 2009 11:31 am

I hope this does not degrade into a $h1t fight among the major users of this proposed port. There's already 3-4 conflicting agendas - *sigh*
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#23 Post by rhino » Mon May 11, 2009 10:52 am

I found this in Adelaide Now:

Eyre Peninsula to get desal plant

CHRISTOPHER RUSSELL, BUSINESS EDITOR
May 07, 2009 11:30pm


THE Eyre Peninsula will get a desalination plant, SA Water chief executive Anne Howe says.
The utility is working on a water security strategy for the peninsula and has found ground water supplies are less plentiful than previously believed.
This had put desalination back on the agenda, including the option of joining BHP Billiton's proposed plant at Point Lowly.
"They'll get their desal plant,'' she said of the Eyre Peninsula community. Studies over the next six months will look at options for a desal plant, including location.
BHP Billiton proposes to build a plant at Point Lowly with a 100Gl a year capacity, including 30Gl a year for the public if the State Government joins the project.
Ms Howe told an Australia-Israel Chamber of Commerce lunch SA Water was revisiting the BHP option after going cold on the plan last year.
SA Water had felt the Point Lowly plant was too expensive and that the Eyre Peninsula could continue to rely on its River Murray pipeline and ground water sources.
This view was bolstered by the Government's commitment to build the Port Stanvac desalination plant, easing the pressure to save 30Gl of Murray water.
"As we started doing the numbers it just wasn't making sense,'' Ms Howe said.
"However, we've just completed a long-term plan for the Eyre Peninsula and unfortunately we found there was knowledge missing about the sustainability of ground water.
"So over the next six months we're doing an assessment of a desal plant for the Eyre Peninsula.
"It was always on the table but because of the state of supply we're going to bring that forward.
"It's really just a matter of where and when, now.''
Ms Howe said South Australia had been caught out by being complacent over water supply but was now pursuing a wide ranging strategy involving bigger storage, stormwater projects, recycling and efficiency.
cheers,
Rhino

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#24 Post by rhino » Mon May 18, 2009 1:26 pm

Port Bonython on Canberra funding list

SARAH MARTIN
May 14, 2009 10:30am


INFRASTRUCTURE Australia has added Port Bonython to its list of priority developments, opening the project to Commonwealth funding.
Released to coincide with the federal Budget on Tuesday, the priority list recommends Port Bonython near Whyalla be developed as part of the national ports strategy.
Infrastructure Australia has analysed more than 1000 national projects and has earmarked the ones it deems most important for Australia's long-term economic development. Only 35 have made the final list.
The inclusion will mean the project is eligible for Building Australia funds, which would help expedite the port's construction.
A preliminary list released in December did not include the port.
Western Plains Resources, potential users of the bulk commodity export facility, say they are confident the inclusion will lead to a contribution from the Commonwealth.
Western Plains Resources executive chairman Bob Duffin said Oakajee Port in WA had been granted money from Tuesday's federal Budget as a result of its inclusion on the list.
He said without being listed as a priority, getting any Commonwealth funding for Port Bonython would be ``impossible''.
He said while the project had been included as a result of State Government lobbying, ``it is now up to the state of South Australia to make the economic argument to the Commonwealth for it to provide some funding for the development''.
"The state recognises the potential users of the port are at different stages of the development cycle and while over time there will be users to justify the capital investment by the private sector, in order to get the facility developed earlier . . . there needs to be some level of Government support.''
Mr Duffin said the announcement was a vote of confidence in the potential of developments on the Eyre Peninsula.
"I think potential users will take comfort from the fact that the state is getting behind the project and the Commonwealth has recognised the project is one of national importance.''
Several other South Australian projects have also been included on the list, including the Torrens and Goodwood freight junctions, the northern connector road and rail corridor, and the Gawler and Seaford rail upgrades.
cheers,
Rhino

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#25 Post by rhino » Wed Jul 29, 2009 4:39 pm

Port Bonython sinking in a sea of paper
SARAH MARTIN
July 27, 2009 11:30pm


THE State Government risks losing further investment in the mining sector by dragging its feet on the development of Port Bonython, industry figures say.
The Government has said it is committed to a deep-sea export facility at Port Bonython to assist iron ore mining activity on the Eyre Peninsula, and wants to see the port operational by 2011.
In March, the Flinders Ports-led Spencer Gulf Port Link Consortium submitted a feasibility study to the Department of Infrastructure with the Government promising a response would be given soon.
Western Plains Resources chief executive Bob Duffin said the delay was ``ridiculous'' and industry had been left in the dark over the port's progress.
"Here we are nearly four months later and absolutely nobody in government seems to know what is going on,'' he said.
"Our view is if the government and the consortium are unable to reach an agreement on the commercial terms of the development of this port, they should both get out of the way and let us get on with the job.''
Mr Duffin said Western Plains could develop the port with Wuhan Iron and Steel Company, its $45 million joint-venture partner for the Hawk's Nest iron ore deposit near Coober Pedy.
"(The situation) is hindering development going forward, it is limiting the creation of jobs, and it is hindering the generation of royalty income for South Australia.'' he said.
SA chamber of mines and energy CEO Jason Kuchel said industry would have liked a response "much earlier''.
"It is an absolutely critical piece of infrastructure,'' he said.
"This economic climate requires the government to take some decisive measures to ensure that economic activity is not lost to the state and undoubtedly a bulk-commodities port would drive a great deal more by way of exploration and development activity on the Eyre Peninsula.''
Yesterday, a spokeswoman for Infrastructure Minister Patrick Conlon said the consortium had requested more time to develop a proposal and the State Government ``had not been dragging its feet on this matter''.
But Flinders Ports chief executive Vincent Tremaine said the consortium was yet to receive a response from the Government and was not developing a further proposal.
Mr Tremaine also said the port would "probably not'' be developed by 2011.
"The building itself takes nearly two years so it is a huge project - there are a lot of studies to go through and a lot of building to be done,'' he said.



Time to pull the digit out and do some approving, methinks
cheers,
Rhino

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New port at Sheep Hill (Eyre Peninsula)

#26 Post by rhino » Wed Jul 29, 2009 4:56 pm

China's Wuhan Iron and Steel Co to invest in two SA mines
CAMERON ENGLAND, CHIEF BUSINESS REPORTER
July 21, 2009 01:30pm


A CHINESE company has agreed to invest up to $186 million in two SA iron ore mines, in a move which will create hundreds of jobs for up to 40 years.
In a sign that at least for some companies, the China-Australia resources compact remains on track, Wuhan Iron and Steel Co. (WISCO) has signed a formal agreement to develop the projects north of Port Lincoln.
The deal, which had been previously announced, but not formally signed, will pay Centrex a minimum of $78 million, with the remainder paid when the Adelaide company meets certain benchmarks.
Wuhan will receive a 60 per cent stake for its investment.
In a separate agreement, WISCO and Centrex will set up a joint venture to develop a deep water port at Sheep Hill, north of Port Lincoln, to export the iron ore.
Centrex is currently awaiting approval from the Development Assessment Commission to build a bulk handling facility to export ore from a separate mine at Wilgerup on the Peninsula, via the Port Lincoln wharf.
This plan, which is unrelated to the WISCO deal, has created controversy among some members of the Port Lincoln community, who believe it could threaten the town's aquaculture industry.
The business relationship between Australia and China has been strained in recent weeks, following the arrest of Rio Tinto executive Stern Hu on suspicion of espionage, and bribing steel mills for sensitive commercial information.
Centrex chairman David Lindh said in a statement that Centrex and WISCO had a close and transparent relationship.
"The joint venture is an extraordinary vote of confidence by our Chinese partners in the re-emergence of an invigorated iron ore industry on Eyre Peninsula,'' Mr Lindh said.
"The signing is even more significant against the current tensions within the global sea traded iron ore market where negotiations over price and alliances, publicly exhibit evidence of strain.
"We applaud our Chinese partners for their due diligence on Centrex and willingness to work harmoniously with us to achieve a commercial outcome that is long-term, solid and is in its own right, a benchmark for what can be achieved between Australia and China.''
After discovering enough iron ore resources, Centrex plans to start two iron ore mines, each exporting five million tonnes per year.
The deal requires approval from Australia's Foreign Investment Review Board and China's National Development Reform Commission.
cheers,
Rhino

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#27 Post by Wayno » Wed Jul 29, 2009 5:38 pm

delayed due to imminent state election and risk of losing votes from locals on eyre peninsula, me thinks...
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#28 Post by rhino » Thu Dec 10, 2009 8:32 am

From today's Adelaide Now:

Seafood giants protest Port Lowly desalination plant
NIGEL AUSTIN
December 10, 2009 12:01am


HEAVYWEIGHTS of the seafood sector gathered at Port Lincoln in a seldom seen display of strength to protest at BHP Billiton's proposed desalination plant at Point Lowly.
Tuna barons and leaders from across the $800 million seafood sector demanded the desalination plant be moved away from Spencer Gulf.
Under their new "keep the gulf clean" campaign, they are focused on protecting the region's prime fishing and aquaculture grounds.
Spencer Gulf & West Coast Prawn Fishermen's Association fishing co-ordinator Greg Palmer said the campaign was a show of force by the state's renowned seafood sectors.
"This sends a very clear message about the weight of opposition to BHP locating a desalination plant at Point Lowly and importantly the campaign is based on good scientific reasons," Mr Palmer said.
"Discharging effluent into the Spencer Gulf, one of Australia's most sensitive marine ecologies with unique tidal movements, would be environmentally irresponsible.
"It is particularly so given that no one knows what the long-term impact will be on a whole range of native marine species."
The campaign ambassadors unveiled at the launch represent industries including tuna, sardines, abalone, kingfish, oysters and crabs. They included tuna king Hagen Stehr, Kinkawooka Mussels managing director Andrew Puglisi, Wildcatch Fisheries SA chairman Dr Gary Morgan and SA Sardine Association executive officer Christian Pyke.
Mr Stehr said he was all in favour of development, but in this instance everyone should be careful about how quickly the desalination plant was being pushed along.
"We need to dot our i's and cross our t's because the whole seafood industry is so valuable as well as the cuttlefish," Mr Stehr said. "We have operations from Port Augusta to Port Lincoln and it is of grave concern to all people who make their living in the gulf.
"I'm not a greenie, but we have looked after the sea for 50 years and we'd hate to stuff it up now because it's BHP, when there are other alternatives."
Mr Palmer said BHP should build the desalination plant along the southern Eyre Peninsula coast where the discharge from the desalination plant would flow into the open sea.
cheers,
Rhino

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#29 Post by citybangbang » Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:16 am

From Adelaide Now
Whyalla diesel refinery approval to fuel SA Mining
CAMERON ENGLAND, CHIEF BUSINESS REPORTER

THE State Government has approved the construction of a $110 million diesel storage and refinery facility at Port Bonython, north of Whyalla.

Adelaide-based energy company Stuart Petroleum, through its subsidiary Port Bonython Fuels, won approval to build the facility, which has the potential to become a diesel hub for South Australia's mining and transport industries.

The project's $60 million first stage would include:

CONSTRUCTION of fuel unloading facilities at Port Bonython jetty.
A 5.3KM fuel pipeline.
STORAGE tanks with a capacity more than 100 million litres.
TRUCK loading facilities.
The second stage would involve building a refinery, which would process oil from the Cooper Basin into diesel, and an expansion of storage capacity.

Port Bonython is used by Santos for the export of LPG and other petroleum products.

Stuart was negotiating with customers and diesel suppliers, and hoped to make a final decision to go ahead with the project before the middle of the year, managing director Tino Guglielmo said yesterday.

Australia is a net importer of diesel, with much of it coming from South-East Asia.

"What this does is allows us to bring in larger economic quantities directly from South-East Asia,'' Mr Guglielmo said.

"Stuart is presently negotiating with major industry participants who have expressed an interest in the project and Port Bonython fuels may ultimately choose to share its 100 per cent equity with a business partner.''

The facility would be capable of delivering up to a billion litres of diesel a year, he said.

Urban Development and Planning Minister Paul Holloway said the two-stage development would create 20 jobs in the Upper Spencer Gulf during construction and a further 20 jobs once it was operating.

"That is great news for the local economy of Whyalla,'' Mr Holloway said.

"his proposal has been assessed by the Development Assessment Commission and I have accepted that independent authority's recommendation that the project be given conditional approval.

"The 23 conditions imposed on the development ensure that no environmental harm is caused and the appropriate management plans are in place to govern its construction and operation.''
Whyalla Economic Development Board chief executive officer Steve Arndt said the project was a sign of confidence, especially for the mining sector.

"This is an important project for us in terms of really kicking things off in 2010 and this is only going to be the start for what's going to be a pretty big couple of years for Whyalla,'' he said.

Mr Arndt said Whyalla was already a hub for the mining sector, servicing OneSteel's Whyalla iron ore and steel-making operations, BHP Billiton's Olympic Dam mine and many iron ore projects at various stages of development on the Eyre Peninsula.

"Port Bonython is geographically central to current and future major product users and as such presents a sound logistical solution to long-term fuel supplies for industry and other users in the northern and western regions of our state,'' he said.

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Re: #PRO: Point Lowly Developments

#30 Post by rhino » Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:18 am

This is good news, both for the region and for South Australia as a whole - shows confidence in our future.
cheers,
Rhino

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