Beer Garden

Anything goes here.. :) Now with Beer Garden for our smoking patrons.
SBD
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by SBD »

rev wrote:
Wed Jan 27, 2021 4:22 pm
We shouldn't have to wait for an election campaign to begin.
Agreed, and we could also argue that the election campaign started almost three years ago. Unfortunately, the reality is that if The Opposition has a good idea and announces it early, the Government has the opportunity to cherry pick the good bits and claim credit for getting them started. If Government has a good idea and announces it before it has funding in place to implement it immediately, the Opposition will gain political capital by complaining about the "delays". This happens whichever party is in Government or Opposition.
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by ChillyPhilly »

SBD wrote:
rev wrote:
Wed Jan 27, 2021 4:22 pm
We shouldn't have to wait for an election campaign to begin.
Agreed, and we could also argue that the election campaign started almost three years ago. Unfortunately, the reality is that if The Opposition has a good idea and announces it early, the Government has the opportunity to cherry pick the good bits and claim credit for getting them started. If Government has a good idea and announces it before it has funding in place to implement it immediately, the Opposition will gain political capital by complaining about the "delays". This happens whichever party is in Government or Opposition.
Presenting a comprehensive masterplan is only a good thing.
Our state, our city, our future.

All views expressed on this forum are my own.
Nort
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by Nort »

ChillyPhilly wrote:
Wed Jan 27, 2021 5:10 pm
SBD wrote:
rev wrote:
Wed Jan 27, 2021 4:22 pm
We shouldn't have to wait for an election campaign to begin.
Agreed, and we could also argue that the election campaign started almost three years ago. Unfortunately, the reality is that if The Opposition has a good idea and announces it early, the Government has the opportunity to cherry pick the good bits and claim credit for getting them started. If Government has a good idea and announces it before it has funding in place to implement it immediately, the Opposition will gain political capital by complaining about the "delays". This happens whichever party is in Government or Opposition.
Presenting a comprehensive masterplan is only a good thing.
It should be a good thing, but Australian political history shows otherwise.

Federally, two of the biggest surprise results in recent decades were 1993 and 2019. Both of which involved an opposition releasing lots of detailed policies and suffering for it.
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rev
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by rev »

https://www.news.com.au/technology/onli ... 5f37a73d50

The Greens have lost the plot, if it wasn't already the case.
Yes, that's what we should do with tax payers money, spend it on a search engine, that way we will take another step to being like the Green's idol communist China in that the government can have total control on what search results appear. :lol:

There's already alternatives to Google, such as Bing and Duckduckgo. Startpage uses Google search results, minus the Google tracking. Search Encrypt is another alternative.

What a waste of space and tax payers money the Greens are in our parliament.
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gnrc_louis
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by gnrc_louis »

rev wrote:
Wed Feb 03, 2021 1:28 pm
https://www.news.com.au/technology/onli ... 5f37a73d50

The Greens have lost the plot, if it wasn't already the case.
Yes, that's what we should do with tax payers money, spend it on a search engine, that way we will take another step to being like the Green's idol communist China in that the government can have total control on what search results appear. :lol:

There's already alternatives to Google, such as Bing and Duckduckgo. Startpage uses Google search results, minus the Google tracking. Search Encrypt is another alternative.

What a waste of space and tax payers money the Greens are in our parliament.
If it operated like an independent entity it would be a good thing. Democratization of access to information through sites like Wikipedia, AustLII etc. is an overwhelmingly positive thing imo and a not for profit search engine would sit nicely alongside them.
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rev
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by rev »

gnrc_louis wrote:
Wed Feb 03, 2021 9:27 pm
rev wrote:
Wed Feb 03, 2021 1:28 pm
https://www.news.com.au/technology/onli ... 5f37a73d50

The Greens have lost the plot, if it wasn't already the case.
Yes, that's what we should do with tax payers money, spend it on a search engine, that way we will take another step to being like the Green's idol communist China in that the government can have total control on what search results appear. :lol:

There's already alternatives to Google, such as Bing and Duckduckgo. Startpage uses Google search results, minus the Google tracking. Search Encrypt is another alternative.

What a waste of space and tax payers money the Greens are in our parliament.
If it operated like an independent entity it would be a good thing. Democratization of access to information through sites like Wikipedia, AustLII etc. is an overwhelmingly positive thing imo and a not for profit search engine would sit nicely alongside them.
Government should have no part in it, this is Australia not communist China.

There's already alternatives to Google. There's absolutely no need to use tax payers money for a search engine.
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by Nort »

I'm far from convinced of the need for a publicly funded search engine, however your arguments seem like they could equally apply against concepts like public libraries (and indeed by some were).
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rev
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by rev »

Record sales growth for house-and-land packages at greenfield sites across SA

House-and-land package sales have hit record levels, with new estates seeing enormous growth as more people work from home – shunning smaller apartments.


Booming demand in South Australia for house-and-land packages has fuelled a “standout” year for greenfield developers, who have experienced record sales growth, a major industry report says.

The Urban Development Institute of Australia’s State of the Land report reveals annual SA land sales increased by 83 per cent, from 2054 in 2019 to a record 3766 last year.

The 2020 result is 48 per cent higher than the previous highest volume set in 2013 and has been attributed to historically low interest rates and government housing stimulus packages including HomeBuilder.

Adelaide’s northern suburbs led the charge recording a 168 per cent surge in sales since “pre-COVID” the report said, followed by the Barossa – up 142 per cent – and Adelaide and the southern suburbs recording 70 per cent in sales respectively.

Developers released on average an extra 50 per cent more blocks between June and December 2020, compared with the previous six months.

UDIA SA chief executive Pat Gerace said the record land sale result was driven by the HomeBuilder grant and people wanting to work from home and have larger abodes.

“While other capitals have been impacted more through the slashing of overseas migration, we don’t believe SA has been as impacted as much,” he said.

“Developers and agents have told us that some of this has been softened by ex-pats returning home or first homebuyers deferring travel plans and buying property instead, mainly in suburban areas with good amenity.

“The very quick upward trend in sales late last year is good for economic activity and jobs, but highlights the critical need to ensure new estates come online to maintain our competitive price point in comparison to other states.”

The median greenfield land price increased by 2 per cent to $183,000 but remained the cheapest among capital cities.

The UDIA report, compiled with property date company CoreLogic, reveal multi-unit completions fell by 38 per cent from 3501 in 2019 to 2164 last year.

New apartment and townhouse stock remained “subdued” in 2020 with 1840 new sales, a 9 per cent decline on 2019, the report said.

Adelaide had the nation’s highest concentration of units within 10km of the CBD, driven by increased urban regeneration and infill projects such as Bowden and new projects in the CBD.

Fifty-two per cent of the new multi-unit dwelling completions in the greater Adelaide region occurred within 5km of the Adelaide GPO, followed by 40 per cent in the 5km-to-10km band.

The State Government has rezoned many inner-suburban areas to allow higher-density development.

The government said 70 per cent of new housing was happening in established suburbs, compared with 76 per cent in 2015.

CoreLogic head of research Eliza Owen said detached houses were expected to remain in “high demand over units” in 2021 and record higher capital growth.

Housing Industry Association SA executive director Stephen Knight said consumer demand for larger blocks would increase because of the COVID crisis with a “trend towards home offices and more space and a trend away from apartment living”.

“If demand continues for larger blocks then availability of suitable subdividable land will become an issue,” he said.

Adelaide University’s property expert and lecturer Peter Koulizos agreed saying people working from home would drive less demand for small places.

“The trend has already started … developers are telling me that no one is interested in two-bedroom apartments or townhouses, they want three-bedroom houses and more,” the chair of the Property Investment Professionals of Australia said.

“Research has also shown that the less often you have to go to work the more you’re willing to live away from work.”

MAKING MOVE FROM EAST TO WEST

Proximity to the city, parks and choice of housing options is what drew first-home buyer Renee Slunjski to Bowden.

The area has undergone a huge renaissance from industrial estate to hip housing estate with an extra 594 houses, units, townhouses and semi-detached properties built in the past six years according to property data from the Valuer General.

“I didn’t do too much searching because I was really happy with the options in Bowden,” Ms Slunjski, 27, who lives with her partner Nick Purgacz, said.

“The Artisan (apartment block) was rustic and modern and it’s location on the outskirts of Bowden appealed to me as I didn’t feel boxed … the location is fantastic, we love being able to walk to work.”

Ms Slunjski, an optometrist, bought her two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment off the plan in 2017 and took occupancy in January 2019.

She and Mr Purgac moved from Adelaide’s eastern suburbs and love being part of the Bowden “culture”.

“Nick and I love walking along the Torrens a few times a week, around Adelaide Oval and through North Adelaide – it never gets old, and we’re so grateful to have that as our backyard,” she said.

“Sometimes we think it’d be nice to have a backyard, but with two balconies and the facilities around us we don’t think we miss out, maybe when there’s kids in the picture it would be nice to have more space.

“It’s a massive advantage being able to clean the house together in an hour, so we have time to enjoy our weekends.

“This was a first step into the property market and hopefully we can keep it as an investment when we move to the next step into something bigger.”
https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/sou ... d3304a9eb1

Like I've said many times, the majority do not want to live in tiny apartments.
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by cmet »

rev wrote:
Record sales growth for house-and-land packages at greenfield sites across SA

House-and-land package sales have hit record levels, with new estates seeing enormous growth as more people work from home – shunning smaller apartments.


Booming demand in South Australia for house-and-land packages has fuelled a “standout” year for greenfield developers, who have experienced record sales growth, a major industry report says.

The Urban Development Institute of Australia’s State of the Land report reveals annual SA land sales increased by 83 per cent, from 2054 in 2019 to a record 3766 last year.

The 2020 result is 48 per cent higher than the previous highest volume set in 2013 and has been attributed to historically low interest rates and government housing stimulus packages including HomeBuilder.

Adelaide’s northern suburbs led the charge recording a 168 per cent surge in sales since “pre-COVID” the report said, followed by the Barossa – up 142 per cent – and Adelaide and the southern suburbs recording 70 per cent in sales respectively.

Developers released on average an extra 50 per cent more blocks between June and December 2020, compared with the previous six months.

UDIA SA chief executive Pat Gerace said the record land sale result was driven by the HomeBuilder grant and people wanting to work from home and have larger abodes.

“While other capitals have been impacted more through the slashing of overseas migration, we don’t believe SA has been as impacted as much,” he said.

“Developers and agents have told us that some of this has been softened by ex-pats returning home or first homebuyers deferring travel plans and buying property instead, mainly in suburban areas with good amenity.

“The very quick upward trend in sales late last year is good for economic activity and jobs, but highlights the critical need to ensure new estates come online to maintain our competitive price point in comparison to other states.”

The median greenfield land price increased by 2 per cent to $183,000 but remained the cheapest among capital cities.

The UDIA report, compiled with property date company CoreLogic, reveal multi-unit completions fell by 38 per cent from 3501 in 2019 to 2164 last year.

New apartment and townhouse stock remained “subdued” in 2020 with 1840 new sales, a 9 per cent decline on 2019, the report said.

Adelaide had the nation’s highest concentration of units within 10km of the CBD, driven by increased urban regeneration and infill projects such as Bowden and new projects in the CBD.

Fifty-two per cent of the new multi-unit dwelling completions in the greater Adelaide region occurred within 5km of the Adelaide GPO, followed by 40 per cent in the 5km-to-10km band.

The State Government has rezoned many inner-suburban areas to allow higher-density development.

The government said 70 per cent of new housing was happening in established suburbs, compared with 76 per cent in 2015.

CoreLogic head of research Eliza Owen said detached houses were expected to remain in “high demand over units” in 2021 and record higher capital growth.

Housing Industry Association SA executive director Stephen Knight said consumer demand for larger blocks would increase because of the COVID crisis with a “trend towards home offices and more space and a trend away from apartment living”.

“If demand continues for larger blocks then availability of suitable subdividable land will become an issue,” he said.

Adelaide University’s property expert and lecturer Peter Koulizos agreed saying people working from home would drive less demand for small places.

“The trend has already started … developers are telling me that no one is interested in two-bedroom apartments or townhouses, they want three-bedroom houses and more,” the chair of the Property Investment Professionals of Australia said.

“Research has also shown that the less often you have to go to work the more you’re willing to live away from work.”

MAKING MOVE FROM EAST TO WEST

Proximity to the city, parks and choice of housing options is what drew first-home buyer Renee Slunjski to Bowden.

The area has undergone a huge renaissance from industrial estate to hip housing estate with an extra 594 houses, units, townhouses and semi-detached properties built in the past six years according to property data from the Valuer General.

“I didn’t do too much searching because I was really happy with the options in Bowden,” Ms Slunjski, 27, who lives with her partner Nick Purgacz, said.

“The Artisan (apartment block) was rustic and modern and it’s location on the outskirts of Bowden appealed to me as I didn’t feel boxed … the location is fantastic, we love being able to walk to work.”

Ms Slunjski, an optometrist, bought her two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment off the plan in 2017 and took occupancy in January 2019.

She and Mr Purgac moved from Adelaide’s eastern suburbs and love being part of the Bowden “culture”.

“Nick and I love walking along the Torrens a few times a week, around Adelaide Oval and through North Adelaide – it never gets old, and we’re so grateful to have that as our backyard,” she said.

“Sometimes we think it’d be nice to have a backyard, but with two balconies and the facilities around us we don’t think we miss out, maybe when there’s kids in the picture it would be nice to have more space.

“It’s a massive advantage being able to clean the house together in an hour, so we have time to enjoy our weekends.

“This was a first step into the property market and hopefully we can keep it as an investment when we move to the next step into something bigger.”
https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/sou ... d3304a9eb1

Like I've said many times, the majority do not want to live in tiny apartments.
It really depends on the democratic. I work as a valuer and the vast majority of people buying up land in these areas are people who either already lived in outer suburbs, are first home buyers, or up-sizers. Most of these people don’t work in the CBD so of course they don’t need or possibly want to live in the inner city, here they pay more for land that they wouldn’t fully benefit from (close to employment). There’s definitely a place for developments around angle vale etc, but there’s also definitely a need for more housing closer to the CBD. Not only is it closer to the states main employment centre, it reduces the need for more public infrastructure spending, and spares important farm land that is some of the states best. An area that comes to mind that would be ideal for a lot of subdivision is somewhere like Campbelltown or Newton.
Nort
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by Nort »

Yeah, "people want the best property they can afford that suits their lifestyle" isn't a shocking revelation.

There is totally a place for outer suburbs development, and for many people that is the best choice. However as a society we often confuse the cheaper cost for those developments to the occupiers with the costs to society of providing the appropriate infrastructure to those locations.
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by SBD »

Nort wrote:
Wed Mar 17, 2021 10:12 am
Yeah, "people want the best property they can afford that suits their lifestyle" isn't a shocking revelation.

There is totally a place for outer suburbs development, and for many people that is the best choice. However as a society we often confuse the cheaper cost for those developments to the occupiers with the costs to society of providing the appropriate infrastructure to those locations.
I own and live in a large house on a large block in one of those outer suburbs. I have a 20 minute drive to my office in an industrial area with one bus each way per day. I'm not in one of the cheap dumps maligned on this web site. The bus close to home is further than I expected when I moved here (Google says it's a 12 minute walk) but I don't miss it.

My wife drives 30-45 minutes (2 sites) commute away from the city for her work. I think I have been in to the Adelaide CBD at most once so far this year. My wife has been in to the CBD a few times for different reasons, and to suburbs the other side of it. She might have driven about 5km to a local railway station (rather than the bus), but drives all the way rather than use the rail substitute bus. We also drive to the doctor and supermarket.

Do people who live in inner suburbs really use the bus, tram or train for their weekly grocery shopping and medical appointments, sharing their germs with the other passengers?
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by cmet »

SBD wrote:
Nort wrote:
Wed Mar 17, 2021 10:12 am
Yeah, "people want the best property they can afford that suits their lifestyle" isn't a shocking revelation.

There is totally a place for outer suburbs development, and for many people that is the best choice. However as a society we often confuse the cheaper cost for those developments to the occupiers with the costs to society of providing the appropriate infrastructure to those locations.
I own and live in a large house on a large block in one of those outer suburbs. I have a 20 minute drive to my office in an industrial area with one bus each way per day. I'm not in one of the cheap dumps maligned on this web site. The bus close to home is further than I expected when I moved here (Google says it's a 12 minute walk) but I don't miss it.

My wife drives 30-45 minutes (2 sites) commute away from the city for her work. I think I have been in to the Adelaide CBD at most once so far this year. My wife has been in to the CBD a few times for different reasons, and to suburbs the other side of it. She might have driven about 5km to a local railway station (rather than the bus), but drives all the way rather than use the rail substitute bus. We also drive to the doctor and supermarket.

Do people who live in inner suburbs really use the bus, tram or train for their weekly grocery shopping and medical appointments, sharing their germs with the other passengers?
No they don’t, because train and tram infrastructure here in Adelaide is below average. A lot more people do In the Sydneys and Melbournes of the world
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Norman
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by Norman »

Not everyone does a weekly shop, I used to go shopping almost everyday after work to cook for that night, and might do a bigger shop once a month. It really depends on your preference, lifestyle and living situation.
SBD
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by SBD »

Norman wrote:
Fri Mar 19, 2021 1:16 am
Not everyone does a weekly shop, I used to go shopping almost everyday after work to cook for that night, and might do a bigger shop once a month. It really depends on your preference, lifestyle and living situation.
I guess urban design and lifestyle develop together. Our preferred nearby supermarket is too big to be convenient for daily shopping. For small convenience shopping I go somewhere else that the back of the shop is closer to the door (and car park and bus stop).
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Re: Beer Garden

Post by Llessur2002 »

Not forgetting the increased popularity of home delivery. Not everyone needs a car to do their weekly shop any more.

I live in Croydon and as a family we use the train loads (plus bikes where possible). We have one car and probably only do 5-7,000km in that every year. It's perfectly possible to rely heavily on PT if you live near enough to it which, as cmet touched on above, is can be a problem in Adelaide.

As I've said before, I think type of PT is important too - I suspect people living near tram and train routes will be more inclined to use it. I'd probably use the car a lot more if we were only served by buses. I would suspect the AdeLINK tram network would have increased patronage significantly - especially as more and more amenities were built near tram stops. I hope it resurfaces in some form in the future.
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